„A respectable appearance is sufficient to make people more interested in your soul“

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Karl Lagerfeld1
stilista, fotografo e regista tedesco 1933 - 2019
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„Political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind.“

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„It is a remarkable fact in the history of science, that the more extended human knowledge has become, the more limited human power, in that respect, has constantly appeared.“

—  Adolphe Quetelet Belgian astronomer, mathematician, statistician and sociologist 1796 - 1874
Context: It is a remarkable fact in the history of science, that the more extended human knowledge has become, the more limited human power, in that respect, has constantly appeared. This globe, of which man imagines the haughty possessor, becomes, in the eyes of astronomer, merely a grain of dust floating in immensity of space: an earthquake, a tempest, an inundation, may destroy in an instant an entire people, or ruin the labours of twenty ages.... But if each step in the career of science thus gradually diminishes his importance, his pride has a compensation in the greater idea of his intellectual power, by which he has been enabled to perceive those laws which seem to be, by their nature, placed for ever beyond his grasp. Introductory

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