„I desire the things which will destroy me in the end.“

Journal entry from July 1950 – 1953, page 63 of the original, page 55 of the collection
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (2000)
Origine: The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 25 Marzo 2022. Storia
Sylvia Plath photo
Sylvia Plath17
poeta, scrittore 1932 - 1963

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