„Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action.“

Ultimo aggiornamento 06 Giugno 2022. Storia
William James photo
William James11
psicologo e filosofo statunitense 1842 - 1910

Citazioni simili

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„Action may not always bring happiness but there is no happiness without action.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Books, Coningsby (1844), Lothair (1870)
Variante: Action may not always bring happiness; but there is no happiness without action.

„Happiness, in truth, may not be the fruit plucked by my action yet without action all fruit will die on the vine.
I will act now.
I will act now. I will act now. I will act now.“

—  Og Mandino, libro The Greatest Salesman in the World

Origine: The Greatest Salesman in the World (1968), Ch. 16 : The Scroll Marked IX, p. 95.

Sadhguru photo

„When you are seeking happiness through your action, you are always enslaved to the external situation.“

—  Sadhguru Yogi, mystic, visionary and humanitarian 1957

As long as you are enslaved to the external situation, you will always be in some level of suffering because the outside situation is never going to be hundred percent in your control.
Encounter the Enlightened (2001)

André Maurois photo
Elfriede Jelinek photo

„Happiness happens by chance, and is not a law or the logical consequences of actions.“

—  Elfriede Jelinek Austrian writer 1946

P 8
Women As Lovers (1994)

Francis Hutcheson (philosopher) photo

„That Action is best, which procures the greatest Happiness for the greatest Numbers“

—  Francis Hutcheson (philosopher) Irish philosopher 1694 - 1746

An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725) Treatise II, Section 3
Contesto: That Action is best, which procures the greatest Happiness for the greatest Numbers; and that worst, which, in like manner, occasions Misery.

Gretchen Rubin photo

„We must exercise ourselves in the things which bring happiness, since, if that be present, we have everything, and, if that be absent, all our actions are directed toward attaining it.“

—  Gretchen Rubin American writer 1966

Origine: The Happiness Project: Or Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun

Tenzin Gyatso photo

„Being happy involves both a certain achievement in action and a rational assurance about the outcome.“

—  John Rawls, libro Una teoria della giustizia

Origine: A Theory of Justice (1971; 1975; 1999), Chapter IX, Section 83, p. 549

Zhuangzi photo

„Perfect happiness is keeping yourself alive, and only actionless action can have this affect.“

—  Zhuangzi classic Chinese philosopher -369 - -286 a.C.

Ch. 18 (Martin Palmer/Elizabeth Breuily, Penguin Publishing 1996)

„If I want to be truly happy, I have to be a part of state action - a civil servant.“

—  Wolfgang Drechsler Political Philosophy and Innovation Policy scholar 1963

Lectures http://www.neti.ee/cgi-bin/cache?query=wolfgang+drechsler&alates=0&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tudengiportaal.ee%2Fpealeht%2Findex.php%3Fpage=3%26show=4,1,3,2%26out=1

Jeremy Bentham photo
Thich Nhat Hanh photo
Jack White photo

„It is the pursuit of happiness that brings us happiness, and not the happiness achieved.“

—  Jack White American musician and record producer 1975

A message he left on his website to his fans, dated September 18th, 2003
2003

„If I can reconcile myself to the certainty of death only by forgetting it, I am not happy. And if I can dispose of the fact of human misery about me only by shutting my thoughts as well as myself within my comfortable garden, I may assure myself that I am happy, but I am not. There is a skeleton in the closet of the universe, and I may at any moment be in the face of it. Happiness is inseparable from confidence in action; and confidence of action is inseparable from what the schoolmen called peace -- that is, poise of mind with reference to everything I may possibly encounter in the chances of fortune.“

—  William Ernest Hocking American philosopher 1873 - 1966

Origine: The Meaning of God in Human Experience (1912), Ch. XV : The Need of a God, p. 218.
Contesto: If I can reconcile myself to the certainty of death only by forgetting it, I am not happy. And if I can dispose of the fact of human misery about me only by shutting my thoughts as well as myself within my comfortable garden, I may assure myself that I am happy, but I am not. There is a skeleton in the closet of the universe, and I may at any moment be in the face of it. Happiness is inseparable from confidence in action; and confidence of action is inseparable from what the schoolmen called peace -- that is, poise of mind with reference to everything I may possibly encounter in the chances of fortune.
Now this perfect openness to experience is not possible if pain is the last word of pain. Unless there is something behind the fact of pain, some kind of mystery or problem in it whose solution shows the pain to be other than what it pretends, there is no happiness for man in this world or the next; for no matter how fair the world might in time become, the fact that it had been as bad as it is would remain an unbanishable misery, unbanishable by God or any other power.

Aristotle photo

„Now the activity of the practical virtues is exhibited in political or military affairs, but the actions concerned with these seem to be unleisurely. Warlike actions are completely so (for no one chooses to be at war, or provokes war, for the sake of being at war; any one would seem absolutely murderous if he were to make enemies of his friends in order to bring about battle and slaughter); but the action of the statesman is also unleisurely, and-apart from the political action itself—aims at despotic power and honours, or at all events happiness, for him and his fellow citizens—a happiness different from political action, and evidently sought as being different. So if among virtuous actions political and military actions are distinguished by nobility and greatness, and these are unleisurely and aim at an end and are not desirable for their own sake, but the activity of reason, which is contemplative, seems both to be superior in serious worth and to aim at no end beyond itself, and to have its pleasure proper to itself (and this augments the activity), and the self-sufficiency, leisureliness, unweariedness (so far as this is possible for man), and all the other attributes ascribed to the supremely happy man are evidently those connected with this activity, it follows that this will be the complete happiness of man, if it be allowed a complete term of life.“

—  Aristotle, libro Nicomachean Ethics

Book X, 1177b.6
Nicomachean Ethics

Swami Sivananda photo

„Be Good, Do Good.
Do thou always without attachment perform action which should be done, for by performing action without attachment, man reaches the Supreme.“

—  Swami Sivananda Indian philosopher 1887 - 1963

Light, Power and Wisdom (1959), p. 6; note that the short phrase "Be good, do good" had occurred in spiritual teachings of others in the 19th century, usually in conjunction with other injunctions. "Be Good, Do Good" became a prominent motto of the Divine Life Society.
Light, Power and Wisdom (1959), p. 207
Variante: Be good, do good, be kind, be compassionate.

Candace Bushnell photo

Argomenti correlati