„The inclination to believe in the fantastic may strike some as a failure in logic, or gullibility, but it’s really a gift. A world that might have Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster is clearly superior to one that definitely does not.“

Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
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Chris Van Allsburg7
scrittore e illustratore statunitense 1949

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