„Ten men in our country could buy the whole world and ten million can't buy enough to eat.“

As quoted in The Quotable Will Rogers (2006) by Joseph H. Carter
As quoted in ...

Will Rogers photo
Will Rogers7
attore, comico e giornalista statunitense 1879 - 1935

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John Gay photo
Dalton Trumbo photo

„Put the guns into our hands and we will use them. Give us the slogans and we will turn them into realities. Sing the battle hymns and we will take them up where you left off. Not one, not ten, not ten thousand, not a million, not ten millions, not a hundred millions but a billion, two billions of us all — the people of the world.“

—  Dalton Trumbo, libro Johnny Got His Gun

Johnny Got His Gun (1938)
Contesto: Put the guns into our hands and we will use them. Give us the slogans and we will turn them into realities. Sing the battle hymns and we will take them up where you left off. Not one, not ten, not ten thousand, not a million, not ten millions, not a hundred millions but a billion, two billions of us all — the people of the world. We will have the slogans and we will have the hymns and we will have the guns and we will use them and we will live. Make no mistake of it, we will live. We will be alive and we will walk and talk and eat and sing and laugh and feel and love and bear our children in tranquillity, in security, in decency, in peace. You plan the wars, you masters of men — plan the wars and point the way and we will point the gun.

Walter Scott photo

„It's no fish ye're buying, it's men's lives.“

—  Walter Scott, libro The Antiquary

Volume I, Ch. 11.
The Antiquary (1816)

John Major photo
Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner photo

„If, ten years hence, there are three men of British race to two of Dutch, the country [i.e. South Africa] will be safe and prosperous.“

—  Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner British statesman and colonial administrator 1854 - 1925

Milner on 27 December 1900, in private correspondence with Major Hanbury-Williams, as quoted by C. Headlam in The Milner Papers: South Africa, 1933, Cassell, p. 242

Ashoka photo

„Ten years (of reign) having been completed, King Piodasses (Piyadassi) made known (the doctrine of) Piety to men; and from this moment he has made men more pious, and everything thrives throughout the whole world.“

—  Ashoka Indian emperor of the Maurya Dynasty -304 - -232 a.C.

"The Greek Section of the Kandahar Inscription" as translated by G. P. Carratelli in A Bilingual Graeco-Aramaic Edict by Aśoka: The First Greek Inscription Discovered in Afghanistan (1964) edited by G. P. Carratelli and G. Garbini, p. 32; Piyadassi is one of the titles of Ashoka, meaning Beloved of the Gods<!-- who regards everyone amiably -->, "Piety" here is a translation of the Greek εὐσέβεια, Eusebeia.
Contesto: Ten years (of reign) having been completed, King Piodasses (Piyadassi) made known (the doctrine of) Piety to men; and from this moment he has made men more pious, and everything thrives throughout the whole world. And the king abstains from (killing) living beings, and other men and those who (are) huntsmen and fishermen of the king have desisted from hunting. And if some (were) intemperate, they have ceased from their intemperance as was in their power; and obedient to their father and mother and to the elders, in opposition to the past also in the future, by so acting on every occasion, they will live better and more happily.

Horace Mann photo

„Men are not accustomed to buy books unless they want them.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859

The Duty of Owning Books (1859)
Contesto: Men are not accustomed to buy books unless they want them. If, on visiting the dwelling of a man of slender means, I find the reason why he has cheap carpets and very plain furniture to be that he may purchase books, he rises at once in my esteem. Books are not made for furniture but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house.

Giovanni Boccaccio photo
Vladimir Lenin photo

„All over the world, wherever there are capitalists, freedom of the press means freedom to buy up newspapers, to buy writers, to bribe, buy and fake “public opinion” for the benefit of the bourgeoisie.“

—  Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924

Collected Works, Vol. 32, pp. 504–9.
Collected Works
Origine: Revolution!: Sayings of Vladimir Lenin

Miyamoto Musashi photo

„To master the virtue of the long sword is to govern the world and oneself, thus the long sword is the basis of strategy. The principle is "strategy by means of the long sword". If he attains the virtue of the long sword, one man can beat ten men. Just as one man can beat ten, so a hundred men can beat a thousand, and a thousand men can beat ten thousand. In my strategy, one man is the same as ten thousand, so this strategy is the complete warrior's craft.“

—  Miyamoto Musashi Japanese martial artist, writer, artist 1584 - 1645

Go Rin No Sho (1645), The Ground Book
Contesto: To master the virtue of the long sword is to govern the world and oneself, thus the long sword is the basis of strategy. The principle is "strategy by means of the long sword". If he attains the virtue of the long sword, one man can beat ten men. Just as one man can beat ten, so a hundred men can beat a thousand, and a thousand men can beat ten thousand. In my strategy, one man is the same as ten thousand, so this strategy is the complete warrior's craft.
The Way of the warrior does not include other Ways, such as Confucianism, Buddhism, certain traditions, artistic accomplishments and dancing. But even though these are not part of the Way, if you know the Way broadly you will see it in everything. Men must polish their particular Way.

Robert A. Heinlein photo

„The whole principle is wrong; it's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't eat steak.“

—  Robert A. Heinlein American science fiction author 1907 - 1988

On censorship, in The Man Who Sold the Moon (1950), p. 188; this may be the origin of a remark which in recent years has sometimes become misattributed to Mark Twain: Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it.
Contesto: How anybody expects a man to stay in business with every two-bit wowser in the country claiming a veto over what we can say and can't say and what we can show and what we can't show — it's enough to make you throw up. The whole principle is wrong; it's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't eat steak.

African Spir photo
Anthony Doerr photo
F. E. Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead photo

„Instead of seeing that men got enough to eat the Government spent the whole Session in securing that they should have nothing to drink.“

—  F. E. Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead British politician 1872 - 1930

Speech in Limehouse (4 October 1909) on the Liberal Government's Licensing Bill, quoted in The Times (5 October 1909), p. 4

Herbert Hoover photo

„What the country needs is a good big laugh. … If someone could get off a good joke every ten days, I think our troubles would be over.“

—  Herbert Hoover 31st President of the United States of America 1874 - 1964

Statement http://books.google.com/books?id=6swLAAAAYAAJ&q=%22What+the+country+needs+is+a+good+big+laugh%22+%22if+some+one+could+get+off+a+good+joke+every+ten+days+i+think+our+troubles+would+be+over%22&pg=PA4#v=onepage to Raymond Clapper http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/teachinger/glossary/clapper-raymond.cfm (c. February 1931)

Peter Weiss photo

„The Memorabilia was there, and it was given to them by duty to preserve, and preserve it they would if the darkness in the world lasted ten more centuries, or even ten thousand years…“

—  Walter M. Miller, Jr., libro A Canticle for Leibowitz

Ch 6
A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959), Fiat Homo
Contesto: The monks of the earliest days had not counted on the human ability to generate a new cultural inheritance in a couple of generations if an old one is utterly destroyed, to generate it by virtue of lawgivers and prophets, geniuses or maniacs; through a Moses, or through a Hitler, or an ignorant but tyrannical grandfather, a cultural inheritance may be acquired between dusk and dawn, and many have been so acquired. But the new "culture" was an inheritance of darkness, wherein "simpleton" meant the same thing as "citizen" meant the same thing as "slave." The monks waited. It mattered not at all to them that the knowledge they saved was useless, that much of it was not really knowledge now, was as inscrutable to the monks in some instances as it would be to an illiterate wild-boy from the hills; this knowledge was empty of content, its subject matter long since gone. Still, such knowledge had a symbolic structure that was peculiar to itself, and at least the symbol-interplay could be observed. To observe the way a knowledge-system is knit together is to learn at least a minimum knowledge-of-knowledge, until someday — someday, or some century — an Integrator would come, and things would be fitted together again. So time mattered not at all. The Memorabilia was there, and it was given to them by duty to preserve, and preserve it they would if the darkness in the world lasted ten more centuries, or even ten thousand years...

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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