„Our life is all one human whole, and if we are to have any real knowledge of it we must see it as such. If we cut it up it dies in the process: and so I conceive that the various branches of research that deal with this whole are properly distinguished by change in the point of sight rather than by any division in the thing that is seen. Accordingly, in a former book (Human Nature and Social Order), I tried to see society as it exists in the social nature of man and to display that in its main outlines. In this one the eye is focussed on the enlargement and diversification of intercourse which I have called Social Organization, the individual, though visible, remaining slightly in the background.“

Origine: Social Organization: a Study of the Larger Mind, 1909, p. vii, Preface , lead sentece

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
Charles Horton Cooley photo
Charles Horton Cooley8
sociologo statunitense 1864 - 1929

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