„But since, if the usefulness of the legislation, and the sequence and beauty of the history, were universally evident of itself, we should not believe that any other thing could be understood in the Scriptures save what was obvious, the word of God has arranged that certain stumbling-blocks, as it were, and offences, and impossibili­ties, should be introduced into the midst of the law and the history, in order that we may not, through being drawn away in all directions by the merely attractive na­ture of the language, either altogether fall away from the (true) doctrines, as learn­ing nothing worthy of God, or, by not departing from the letter, come to the knowledge of nothing more divine.“

On First Principles, Bk. 4, ch. 2, par. 15
On First Principles

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
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Origene di Alessandria11
scrittore, religioso, teologo (catechista) 185 - 254

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¶ 86 - 89.
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