„On its pass through finitude, the being-for-itself of the counter-image expresses itself most potently as “”I-ness”, as self-identical individuality. Just as a planet in its orbit no sooner reaches its farthest distance from the center than it returns to its closest proximity, so the point of the farthest distance from God, the I-ness, is also the moment of its return to the Absolute, of the re-absorption into the ideal. P. 30“

Philosophy and Religion 1804)

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
Friedrich Schelling photo
Friedrich Schelling7
filosofo tedesco 1775 - 1854

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