„The labyrinth is conceived as a network of constructs, each of which is essentially an abstraction and, as such, can be picked up and laid down over many, many different events in order to bring them into focus and clothe them with personal meaning. Moreover, the constructs are subject to continual revision, although the complex interdependent relationship between constructs in the system often makes it precarious for the person to revise one construct without taking into account the disruptive effect upon major segments of the system.“

George A. Kelly, "Man's construction of his alternatives." Assessment of human motives (1958): 33-64.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
George Kelly photo
George Kelly1
psicologo, matematico e pedagogista statunitense 1905 - 1967

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