„It is misinterpretation and incomprehension which, very often, provoked an important evolution in the history of philosophy and which, notably, led to the appearance of new notions.“

—  Pierre Hadot, Études de philosophie ancienne (1998), Ce sont les contresens et les incompréhensions qui, très souvent, ont provoqué une évolution importante dans l’histoire de la philosophie, et qui, notamment, ont fait apparaître des notions nouvelles.
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Ce sont les contresens et les incompréhensions qui, très souvent, ont provoqué une évolution importante dans l’histoire de la philosophie, et qui, notamment, ont fait apparaître des notions nouvelles.

Études de philosophie ancienne (1998)

Pierre Hadot photo
Pierre Hadot
filosofo e scrittore francese 1922 - 2010

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