„More people are flattered into virtue than bullied out of vice.“

The Analysis of the Hunting Field (1846) ch. 1

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
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Robert Smith Surtees2
scrittore, editore 1805 - 1864

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