„Passion satisfied has its innocence, almost as fragile as any other.“

—  Marguerite Yourcenar, libro Memorie di Adriano

La passion comblée a son innocence, presque aussi fragile que toute autre.
p. 156
Memoirs of Hadrian (1951)

Originale

La passion comblée a son innocence, presque aussi fragile que toute autre.

Memoirs of Hadrian (1951)

Marguerite Yourcenar photo
Marguerite Yourcenar135
scrittrice francese 1903 - 1987

Citazioni simili

„His long struggle with physical passion was almost over, and, as with many other great sensualists, its place had been taken by an obsession with death.“

—  Kenneth Clark Art historian, broadcaster and museum director 1903 - 1983

Ch. VI: Pathos
Referring to Michelangelo
The Nude: A Study in Ideal Form (1951)

D.H. Lawrence photo
Florence Nightingale photo

„Passion, intellect, moral activity — these three have never been satisfied in a woman. In this cold and oppressive conventional atmosphere, they cannot be satisfied.“

—  Florence Nightingale English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing 1820 - 1910

Cassandra (1860)
Contesto: Passion, intellect, moral activity — these three have never been satisfied in a woman. In this cold and oppressive conventional atmosphere, they cannot be satisfied. To say more on this subject would be to enter into the whole history of society, of the present state of civilisation.

Victor Hugo photo
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester photo

„Love, the most generous passion of the mind
The softest refuge innocence can find“

—  John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester English poet, and peer of the realm 1647 - 1680

A Letter from Artemisia in Town to Chloe in the Country (1679)

Gregory of Nyssa photo
Eric Hoffer photo

„A mass movement attracts and holds a following not because it can satisfy the desire for self-advancement, but because it can satisfy the passion for self-renunciation.“

—  Eric Hoffer, libro The True Believer

Section 7
The True Believer (1951), Part One: The Appeal of Mass Movements
Contesto: There is a fundamental difference between the appeal of a mass movement and the appeal of a practical organization. The practical organization offers opportunities for self-advancement, and its appeal is mainly to self-interest. On the other hand, a mass movement, particularly in its active, revivalist phase, appeals not to those intent on bolstering and advancing a cherished self, but to those who crave to be rid of an unwanted self. A mass movement attracts and holds a following not because it can satisfy the desire for self-advancement, but because it can satisfy the passion for self-renunciation.

Henry Adams photo
Edith Wharton photo
David Hume photo

„Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.“

—  David Hume, libro Trattato sulla natura umana

Part 3, Section 3
Part 3, Section 3
Origine: A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), Book 2: Of the passions
Contesto: We speak not strictly and philosophically when we talk of the combat of passion and of reason. Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.
Contesto: What may at first occur on this head, is, that as nothing can be contrary to truth or reason, except what has a reference to it, and as the judgments of our understanding only have this reference, it must follow, that passions can be contrary to reason only so far as they are accompany'd with some judgment or opinion. According to this principle, which is so obvious and natural, `tis only in two senses, that any affection can be call'd unreasonable. First, When a passion, such as hope or fear, grief or joy, despair or security, is founded on the supposition or the existence of objects, which really do not exist. Secondly, When in exerting any passion in action, we chuse means insufficient for the design'd end, and deceive ourselves in our judgment of causes and effects. Where a passion is neither founded on false suppositions, nor chuses means insufficient for the end, the understanding can neither justify nor condemn it. `Tis not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger. `Tis not contrary to reason for me to chuse my total ruin, to prevent the least uneasiness of an Indian or person wholly unknown to me. `Tis as little contrary to reason to prefer even my own acknowledge'd lesser good to my greater, and have a more ardent affection for the former than the latter. A trivial good may, from certain circumstances, produce a desire superior to what arises from the greatest and most valuable enjoyment; nor is there any thing more extraordinary in this, than in mechanics to see one pound weight raise up a hundred by the advantage of its situation. In short, a passion must be accompany'd with some false judgment. in order to its being unreasonable; and even then `tis not the passion, properly speaking, which is unreasonable, but the judgment.

Joseph Joubert photo
John Barth photo
Thomas Piketty photo
Tacitus photo
Stefan Zweig photo
Oriana Fallaci photo

„People like me who have passion are derided: 'Ha ha ha! She's hysterical!' 'She's very passionate!' Listen how the Americans speak about me: 'A very passionate Italian.“

—  Oriana Fallaci Italian writer 1929 - 2006

Gurley, George. "The Rage of Oriana Fallaci" http://observer.com/2003/01/the-rage-of-oriana-fallaci/, The New York Observer (27 January 2003)

Joseph Joubert photo
George Sand photo

„I have an object, a task, let me say the word, a passion. The profession of writing is a violent and almost indestructible one.“

—  George Sand French novelist and memoirist; pseudonym of Lucile Aurore Dupin 1804 - 1876

J'ai un but, une tâche, disons le mot, une passion. Le métier d'écrire en est une violente et presque indestructible.
Letter to Jules Boucoiran, (4 March 1831), published in Georges Lubin (ed.) Correspondance (Paris: Garnier Freres, 1964-95) vol. 1, pp. 817-18; Frederick Niecks Frederick Chopin: As a Man and Musician (London: Novello, 1890) vol. 1, p. 334

Woodrow Wilson photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x