„The first and most important quality of all scientific ways of thinking must be the clear distinction between the outer object of observation and the subjective nature of the observer.“

—  Max Planck, Where is science going? The Universe in the light of modern physics. (1932)
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Max Planck11
fisico tedesco 1858 - 1947
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„The distinction, between what is done by labour, and what is done by nature, is not always observed.“

—  James Mill Scottish historian, economist, political theorist and philosopher 1773 - 1836
Elements of Political Economy (1821), 'Labour produces its effects only by conspiring with the laws of nature.' It is found that the agency of man can be traced to very simple elements. He does nothing but produce motion. He can move things towards one another, and he can separate them from one another. The properties of matter perform the rest. Ch 1 : Production https://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/economics/mill-james/ch01.htm

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„The first who endeavored to draw a clear line of demarcation between these distinct departments, was Hutton, who declared that geology was in no ways concerned with 'questions as to the origin of things.“

—  Charles Lyell, libro Principles of Geology
Principles of Geology (1832), Vol. 1, Context: It was long ere the distinct nature and legitimate objects of geology were fully recognized, and it was at first confounded with many other branches of inquiry, just as the limits of history, poetry, and mythology were ill-defined in the infancy of civilization. Werner appears to have regarded geology as little other than a subordinate department of mineralogy and Desmarest included it under the head of Physical Geography.... The first who endeavored to draw a clear line of demarcation between these distinct departments, was Hutton, who declared that geology was in no ways concerned with 'questions as to the origin of things. Chpt.1, p. 4

„Empiricism and positivism share the common view that scientific knowledge should in some way be derived from the facts arrived at by observation.“

—  Alan Chalmers, libro What Is This Thing Called Science?
What Is This Thing Called Science? (Third Edition; 1999), Chapter 1, Science as knowledge derived form the facts of experience, p. 3.

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Temple Grandin photo

„Unfortunately, most people never observe the natural cycle of birth and death. They do not realize that for one living thing to survive, another living thing must die.“

—  Temple Grandin, Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism
Context: Most people don't realize that the slaughter plant is much gentler than nature. Animals in the wild die from starvation, predators, or exposure. If I had a choice, I would rather go through a slaughter system than have my guts ripped out by coyotes or lions while I was still conscious. Unfortunately, most people never observe the natural cycle of birth and death. They do not realize that for one living thing to survive, another living thing must die. "Stairway to Heaven," Thinking in Pictures (1995), p. 202.

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Robert Mayer photo

„Were it not for this inalterable armony, pre-established by God, between subject and object, all our thinking would be necessarily without fruit.“

—  Robert Mayer German physicist 1814 - 1878
As translated by Julio Antonio Gonzalo (2008) in The Intelligible Universe: An Overview of the Last Thirteen Billion Years . World Scientific. p. 297 Original: Was aber subjektiv richtig gedacht ist, ist auch objektiv wahr, Ohne diese von Gott zwischen der subjektiven und objektiven Welt prästabilierte ewige Harmonie wäre all unser Denken unfruchtbar Naturwissenschaftliche vorträge (1871). p. 31

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„If it is pleasing to observe in nature her desire to paint God in all his works“

—  Blaise Pascal French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer, and Christian philosopher 1623 - 1662
Conversation on Epictetus and Montaigne, Context: If it is pleasing to observe in nature her desire to paint God in all his works, in which we see some traces of him because they are his images, how much more just is it to consider in the productions of minds the efforts which they make to imitate the essential truth, even in shunning it, and to remark wherein they attain it and wherein they wander from it, as I have endeavored to do in this study.

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