„An intellectual may be defined as a man who speaks with general authority about a subject on which he has no particular competence.“

—  Irving Kristol, Foreign Affairs, July 1967.
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Irving Kristol
giornalista, attivista (padre del neoconservatorismo) 1920 - 2009
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„When you wish to represent a man speaking to a number of people, consider the matter of which he has to treat and adapt his action to the subject.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519
Context: When you wish to represent a man speaking to a number of people, consider the matter of which he has to treat and adapt his action to the subject. Thus, if he speaks persuasively, let his action be appropriate to it. If the matter in hand be to set forth an argument, let the speaker, with the fingers of the right hand hold one finger of the left hand, having the two smaller ones closed; and his face alert, and turned towards the people with mouth a little open, to look as though he spoke; and if he is sitting let him appear as though about to rise, with his head forward. If you represent him standing make him leaning slightly forward with body and head towards the people. These you must represent as silent and attentive, all looking at the orator's face with gestures of admiration; and make some old men in astonishment at the things they hear, with the corners of their mouths pulled down and drawn in, their cheeks full of furrows, and their eyebrows raised, and wrinkling the forehead where they meet.

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„Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970
Ch. 5: Mathematics and the Metaphysicians

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„The Holy Grail of systems engineering, a generic systems methodology has been the subject of the author’s ongoing research for over 20 years.“

—  Derek Hitchins British systems engineer 1935
Derek K Hitchins (2005) Systems Methodology http://sse.stevens.edu/fileadmin/cser/2005/papers/10.pdf

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„The dilemma of the critic has always been that if he knows enough to speak with authority, he knows too much to speak with detachment.“

—  Raymond Chandler Novelist, screenwriter 1888 - 1959
"A Qualified Farewell" (essay, early 1950's), published in The Notebooks of Raymond Chandler (1976)

„Intellectuals may like to think of themselves as people who "speak truth to power" but too often they are people who speak lies to gain power.“

—  Thomas Sowell American economist, social theorist, political philosopher and author 1930
Random Thoughts http://townhall.com/columnists/thomassowell/2004/02/25/random_thoughts/page/full, Feb 25, 2004

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„A man of special learning may be a fool as to common relations. And that he who passes for an intellectual prince may be a moral pauper there are examples enough to show.“

—  Henry George American economist 1839 - 1897
Context: The respect for authority, the presumption in favor of those who have won intellectual reputation, is within reasonable limits, both prudent and becoming. But it should not be carried too far, and there are some things especially as to which it behooves us all to use our own judgment and to maintain free minds. For not only does the history of the world show that undue deference to authority has been the potent agency through which errors have been enthroned and superstitions perpetuated, but there are regions of thought in which the largest powers and the greatest acquirements cannot guard against aberrations or assure deeper insight. One may stand on a box and look over the heads of his fellows, but he no better sees the stars. The telescope and the microscope reveal depths which to the unassisted vision are closed. Yet not merely do they bring us no nearer to the cause of suns and animal-cula, but in looking through them the observer must shut his eyes to what lies about him. That intension is at the expense of extension is seen in the mental as in the physical sphere. A man of special learning may be a fool as to common relations. And that he who passes for an intellectual prince may be a moral pauper there are examples enough to show. Introduction : The Reason for the Examination

„The Authors who write near the beginnings of science, are, in general the most instructive: they take the reader more along with them, shew him the real difficulties, and, which is a main point, teach him the subject, the way by which they themselves learned it.“

—  Robert Woodhouse English mathematician 1773 - 1827
Context: The Authors who write near the beginnings of science, are, in general the most instructive: they take the reader more along with them, shew him the real difficulties, and, which is a main point, teach him the subject, the way by which they themselves learned it.<!--Preface p. v-iv

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