„Different men are made of different stuff.“

La Sorellina di Pilone (1712), Act V., Sc. XVI. — (Burino.)
Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 425.

Originale

Tal persona, tal pasta.

atto V, scena XVI
La sorellina di don Pilone

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
Girolamo Gigli photo
Girolamo Gigli8
letterato e commediografo italiano 1660 - 1722

Citazioni simili

Tanith Lee photo

„Odd, how different different men’s fears could be.“

—  Tanith Lee British writer 1947 - 2015

Origine: Short fiction, Companions on the Road (1975), Chapter 1, “Avillis” (p. 7)

Napoleon I of France photo

„I used to say of him that his presence on the field made the difference of forty thousand men.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, spoken statement (2 November 1831), as quoted in Notes of Conversations with the Duke of Wellington (1886) by Philip Henry Stanhope
About

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington photo

„I used to say of him that his presence on the field made the difference of forty thousand men.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington British soldier and statesman 1769 - 1852

On Napoleon Bonaparte, in notes for 2 November 1831; later, in the notes for 18 September 1836, he is quoted as saying:
It is very true that I have said that I considered Napoleon's presence in the field equal to forty thousand men in the balance. This is a very loose way of talking; but the idea is a very different one from that of his presence at a battle being equal to a reinforcement of forty thousand men.

Toni Morrison photo
William James photo

„Different men find their minds more at home in very different fragments of the world.“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910

A Pluralistic Universe (1909) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/11984/11984-8.txt, Lecture I
1900s
Contesto: Reduced to their most pregnant difference, empiricism means the habit of explaining wholes by parts, and rationalism means the habit of explaining parts by wholes. Rationalism thus preserves affinities with monism, since wholeness goes with union, while empiricism inclines to pluralistic views. No philosophy can ever be anything but a summary sketch, a picture of the world in abridgment, a foreshortened bird's-eye view of the perspective of events. And the first thing to notice is this, that the only material we have at our disposal for making a picture of the whole world is supplied by the various portions of that world of which we have already had experience. We can invent no new forms of conception, applicable to the whole exclusively, and not suggested originally by the parts. All philosophers, accordingly, have conceived of the whole world after the analogy of some particular feature of it which has particularly captivated their attention. Thus, the theists take their cue from manufacture, the pantheists from growth. For one man, the world is like a thought or a grammatical sentence in which a thought is expressed. For such a philosopher, the whole must logically be prior to the parts; for letters would never have been invented without syllables to spell, or syllables without words to utter.
Another man, struck by the disconnectedness and mutual accidentality of so many of the world's details, takes the universe as a whole to have been such a disconnectedness originally, and supposes order to have been superinduced upon it in the second instance, possibly by attrition and the gradual wearing away by internal friction of portions that originally interfered.
Another will conceive the order as only a statistical appearance, and the universe will be for him like a vast grab-bag with black and white balls in it, of which we guess the quantities only probably, by the frequency with which we experience their egress.
For another, again, there is no really inherent order, but it is we who project order into the world by selecting objects and tracing relations so as to gratify our intellectual interests. We carve out order by leaving the disorderly parts out; and the world is conceived thus after the analogy of a forest or a block of marble from which parks or statues may be produced by eliminating irrelevant trees or chips of stone.
Some thinkers follow suggestions from human life, and treat the universe as if it were essentially a place in which ideals are realized. Others are more struck by its lower features, and for them, brute necessities express its character better.
All follow one analogy or another; and all the analogies are with some one or other of the universe's subdivisions. Every one is nevertheless prone to claim that his conclusions are the only logical ones, that they are necessities of universal reason, they being all the while, at bottom, accidents more or less of personal vision which had far better be avowed as such; for one man's vision may be much more valuable than another's, and our visions are usually not only our most interesting but our most respectable contributions to the world in which we play our part. What was reason given to men for, said some eighteenth century writer, except to enable them to find reasons for what they want to think and do?—and I think the history of philosophy largely bears him out, "The aim of knowledge," says Hegel, "is to divest the objective world of its strangeness, and to make us more at home in it." Different men find their minds more at home in very different fragments of the world.

Ram Dass photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„The difference between men is in their principle of association.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

1840s, Essays: First Series (1841), History
Contesto: The difference between men is in their principle of association. Some men classify objects by color and size and other accidents of appearance; others by intrinsic likeness, or by the relation of cause and effect. The progress of the intellect is to the clearer vision of causes, which neglects surface differences. To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine. For the eye is fastened on the life, and slights the circumstance. Every chemical substance, every plant, every animal in its growth, teaches the unity of cause, the variety of appearance.

Norman Mailer photo

„The difference between writing a book and being on television is the difference between conceiving a child and having a baby made in a test tube.“

—  Norman Mailer American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film maker, actor and political candidate 1923 - 2007

"The Siege of Mailer : Hero to Historian" in The Village Voice (21 January 1971); republished in Conversations with Norman Mailer (1988), edited by J. Michael Lennon

Virginia Woolf photo
Robert Jordan photo
Warren Farrell photo
Robert Henri photo
F. Scott Fitzgerald photo
George Lincoln Rockwell photo
G. K. Chesterton photo
Rebecca West photo
Helen Sharman photo

„There is very little difference between men and women in space.“

—  Helen Sharman British chemist who became the first Briton in space 1963

Independent on Sunday, 9 June 1991

Argomenti correlati