„Not only in the realm of the ethical world, and of economy, but also in that of natural phenomena, the realistic orientation of theoretical research can lead only to "real types" and "empirical laws." And in the above point of view, at any rate, no essential difference between the ethical and the natural sciences exists, but at most only one of degree. The realistic orientation of theoretical research excludes in principle, rather, in all realms of the world of phenomena the possibility of arriving at strict (exact) theoretical knowledge.“

Origine: Investigations into the Method of the Social Sciences, 1883, p. 58

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Carl Menger1
economista austriaco 1840 - 1921

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„The fear of speculation, the ostensible rush from the theoretical to the practical, brings about the same shallowness in action that it does in knowledge. It is by studying a strictly theoretical philosophy that we become most acquainted with Ideas, and only Ideas provide action with vigour and ethical meaning.“

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Die Scheu vor der Spekulation, das angebliche Forteilen vom bloß Theoretischen zum Praktischen, bewirkt im Handeln notwendig die gleiche Flachheit wie im Wissen. Das Studium einer streng theoretischen Philosophie macht uns am unmittelbarsten mit Ideen vertraut, und nur Ideen geben dem Handeln Nachdruck und sittliche Bedeutung.
Vorlesungen über die Methode des akademischen Studiums ( Seventh Lecture http://www.zeno.org/Philosophie/M/Schelling,+Friedrich+Wilhelm+Joseph/Vorlesungen+%C3%BCber+die+Methode+des+akademischen+Studiums/7.+%C3%9Cber+einige+%C3%A4u%C3%9Fere+Gegens%C3%A4tze+der+Philosophie,+vornehmlich+den+der+positiven+Wissenschaften), Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schellings sämmtliche Werke, V, 1859, p. 277 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?q1=%22nur%20Ideen%20geben%22;id=uva.x002624295;view=1up;seq=301;start=1;sz=10;page=search;num=277.
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„There are a number of purely theoretical questions, of perennial and passionate interest, which science is unable to answer, at any rate at present.“

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