„Scientific progress has led philosophers to turn their attention from the explanation of physical phenomena, abandoned to science, in order to direct it towards the problem of being itself.“

—  Pierre Hadot, La voile d'Isis: Essai sur l'histoire de l'idée de Nature (2004), Les progrès scientifiques ont amené les philosophes à détourner leur attention de l’explication des phénomènes physiques, abandonnée désormais à la science, pour la diriger vers le problème de l’être lui-même.
Originale

Les progrès scientifiques ont amené les philosophes à détourner leur attention de l’explication des phénomènes physiques, abandonnée désormais à la science, pour la diriger vers le problème de l’être lui-même.

La voile d'Isis: Essai sur l'histoire de l'idée de Nature (2004)

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Pierre Hadot
filosofo e scrittore francese 1922 - 2010

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