„A philosophical attempt to work out a universal history according to a natural plan directed to achieving the civic union of the human race must be regarded as possible and, indeed, as contributing to this end of Nature.“

Ninth Thesis
Idea for a Universal History from a Cosmopolitan Point of View (1784)

Immanuel Kant photo
Immanuel Kant63
filosofo tedesco 1724 - 1804

Citazioni simili

Immanuel Kant photo
Zeno of Citium photo

„The end may be defined as life in accordance with nature or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe.“

—  Zeno of Citium ancient Greek philosopher -334 - -263 a.C.

As quoted by Diogenes Laërtius, in Lives of Eminent Philosophers: 'Zeno', 7.87.
The "end" here means “the goal of life.”

Julian (emperor) photo

„The end and aim of the Cynic philosophy, as indeed of every philosophy, is happiness, but happiness that consists in living according to nature, and not according to the opinions of the multitude.“

—  Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor, philosopher and writer 331 - 363

As quoted in The Works of the Emperor Julian (1923) by Wilmer Cave France Wright, p. 39; also in The Missing Jesus: Rabbinic Judaism and the New Testament (2003) by Craig Alan Evans, Carl A. Elliott, Bruce Chilton, Jacob Neusner
General sources

Joseph Priestley photo

„The History of Electricity is a field full of pleasing objects, according to all the genuine and universal principles of taste, deduced from a knowledge of human nature.“

—  Joseph Priestley, libro The History and Present State of Electricity

Preface
The History and Present State of Electricity (1767)
Contesto: The History of Electricity is a field full of pleasing objects, according to all the genuine and universal principles of taste, deduced from a knowledge of human nature. Scenes like these, in which we see a gradual rise and progress in things, always exhibit a pleasing spectacle to the human mind. Nature, in all her delightful walks, abounds with such views, and they are in a more especial manner connected with every thing that relates to human life and happiness; things, in their own nature, the most interesting to us. Hence it is, that the power of association has annexed crowds of pleasing sensations to the contemplation of every object, in which this property is apparent.
This pleasure, likewise, bears a considerable resemblance to that of the sublime, which is one of the most exquisite of all those that affect the human imagination. For an object in which we see a perpetual progress and improvement is, as it were, continually rising in its magnitude; and moreover, when we see an actual increase, in a long period of time past, we cannot help forming an idea of an unlimited increase in futurity; which is a prospect really boundless, and sublime.

Orson Welles photo

„Race hate isn't human nature; race hate is the abandonment of human nature.“

—  Orson Welles American actor, director, writer and producer 1915 - 1985

Orson Welles, "Race hate must be outlawed" (an editorial), Free World (July, 1944). http://www.wellesnet.com/orson-welles-race-hate-must-outlawed/
Origine: [Higham, Charles, Orson Welles: The Rise and Fall of an American Genius, St. Martin's Press, New York, NY, 1985, 216, 0-312-31280-6, https://books.google.com/books?id=pJBlaIC-VG4C&lpg=PA216&dq=%22race%20hate%20isn't%20human%20nature%22&pg=PA216#v=onepage&q=%22race%20hate%20isn't%20human%20nature%22&f=false]

Robert Boyle photo

„The phaenomena afforded by trades, are a part of the history of nature, and therefore may both challenge the naturalist's curiosity and add to his knowledge, Nor will it suffice to justify learned men in the neglect and contempt of this part of natural history, that the men, from whom it must be learned, are illiterate mechanicks… is indeed childish, and too unworthy of a philosopher, to be worthy of an honest answer.“

—  Robert Boyle English natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, and inventor 1627 - 1691

Compare Francis Bacon's The Great Instauration
"That the Goods of Mankind May be Much Increased by the Naturalist's Insight into Trades" in the Works of Robert Boyle, (1772) Vol.3 as quoted in Clifford D. Conner, A People's History of Science (2005)

Pope John Paul II photo

„human being is by nature a philosopher“

—  Pope John Paul II 264th Pope of the Catholic Church, saint 1920 - 2005

Encyclical Fides et Ratio, 14 September 1998
Origine: www.vatican.va http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_14091998_fides-et-ratio_en.html

Matt Ridley photo
Arthur C. Clarke photo
Camille Paglia photo

„The Sixties attempted a return to nature that ended in disaster.“

—  Camille Paglia American writer 1947

Origine: Sex, Art and American Culture : New Essays (1992), Junk Bonds and Corporate Raiders : Academe in the Hour of the Wolf, p. 216

„The text is really a comment on the limited nature of human language. Such language must by nature be diverse in its attempts to describe that which is One and finally indescribable.“

—  Anantanand Rambachan Hindu studies scholar 1951

Origine: The Nature and Authority of Scripture (1995), p. 20
Contesto: The famous Rgveda text, "One is the Truth, the sages speak of it differently" (1.64.46), is often employed to explain away doctrinal differences as merely semantic ones. The point of this text, as its context makes quite clear, is not really to dismiss the significance of the different ways in which we speak of the One or to see these ways as equally valid. The text is really a comment on the limited nature of human language. Such language must by nature be diverse in its attempts to describe that which is One and finally indescribable. The text, however, is widely cited in ways that seem to make interreligious dialogue redundant.

Sallustius photo
Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802) photo
Thomas Aquinas photo
Immanuel Kant photo

„A plant, an animal, the regular order of nature — probably also the disposition of the whole universe — give manifest evidence that they are possible only by means of and according to ideas“

—  Immanuel Kant, libro Critica della ragion pura

B 374
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)
Contesto: A plant, an animal, the regular order of nature — probably also the disposition of the whole universe — give manifest evidence that they are possible only by means of and according to ideas; that, indeed, no one creature, under the individual conditions of its existence, perfectly harmonizes with the idea of the most perfect of its kind — just as little as man with the idea of humanity, which nevertheless he bears in his soul as the archetypal standard of his actions; that, notwithstanding, these ideas are in the highest sense individually, unchangeably, and completely determined, and are the original causes of things; and that the totality of connected objects in the universe is alone fully adequate to that idea.

John Herschel photo

„To the natural philosopher there is no natural object unimportant or trifling. From the least of nature's works he may learn the greatest lessons.“

—  John Herschel English mathematician, astronomer, chemist and photographer 1792 - 1871

A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831)
Contesto: We must never forget that it is principles, not phenomena, — laws not insulated independent facts, — which are the objects of inquiry to the natural philosopher. As truth is single, and consistent with itself, a principle may be as completely and as plainly elucidated by the most familiar and simple fact, as by the most imposing and uncommon phenomenon. The colours which glitter on a soapbubble are the immediate consequence of a principle the most important, from the variety of phenomena it explains, and the most beautiful, from its simplicity and compendious neatness, in the whole science of optics. If the nature of periodical colours can be made intelligible by the contemplation of such a trivial object, from that moment it becomes a noble instrument in the eye of correct judgment; and to blow a large, regular, and durable soap-bubble may become the serious and praise-worthy endeavour of a sage, while children stand round and scoff, or children of a larger growth hold up their hands in astonishment at such waste of time and trouble. To the natural philosopher there is no natural object unimportant or trifling. From the least of nature's works he may learn the greatest lessons. The fall of an apple to the ground may raise his thoughts to the laws which govern the revolutions of the planets in their orbits; or the situation of a pebble may afford him evidence of the state of the globe he inhabits, myriads of ages ago, before his species became its denizens.
And this, is, in fact, one of the great sources of delight which the study of natural science imparts to its votaries. A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific inquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustible source of pure and exciting contemplations. One would think that Shakspeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding

Jacques Maritain photo
Muhammad Iqbál photo

„Human intellect is natures attempt at self criticism“

—  Muhammad Iqbál Urdu poet and leader of the Pakistan Movement 1877 - 1938

stray reflections[http:www.allamaiqbal.com.htm]

John Wallis photo

„I must trust to my owne Industry, and such Observations as the present Case should afford. And indeed the Nature of the Thing is scarce capable of any other Directions“

—  John Wallis English mathematician 1616 - 1703

An Essay on the Art of Decyphering (1737)
Contesto: I saw, there was little or no Help to bee exspected from others; but that if I should have further Occasions of that Kind, I must trust to my owne Industry, and such Observations as the present Case should afford. And indeed the Nature of the Thing is scarce capable of any other Directions; every new Cipher allmost being contrived in a new Way, which doth not admit any constant Method for the finding of it out: But hee that will do any Thing in it, must first furnish himself with Patience and Sagacity, as well as hee may, and then Consilium in arenâ capere, and make the best Conjectures hee can, till hee shall happen upon something that hee may conclude for Truth.<!--p.14

Adolf Hitler photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“