„Americans love a winner. Americans will not tolerate a loser. Americans despise cowards. Americans play to win all of the time. I wouldn't give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed. That's why Americans have never lost nor will ever lose a war; for the very idea of losing is hateful to an American.“

Speech to the Third Army (1944)

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generale statunitense 1885 - 1945

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„Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life.“

—  Eric Hoffer, libro The True Believer

The True Believer (1951), Part Three: United Action and Self-Sacrifice
Contesto: It is easier to hate an enemy with much good in him than one who is all bad. We cannot hate those we despise. The Japanese had an advantage over us in that they admired us more than we admired them. They could hate us more fervently than we could hate them. The Americans are poor haters in international affairs because of their innate feeling of superiority over all foreigners. An American's hatred for a fellow American (for Hoover or Roosevelt) is far more virulent than any antipathy he can work up against foreigners. It is of interest that the backward South shows more xenophobia than the rest of the country. Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life. <!-- p. 96

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„There has, of late, been much loose speech about "Americanism." Is not this good Americanism? It is surely today the Americanism of those who love their country most. And I fervently hope that it will be and ever remain the Americanism of our children and our children's children.“

—  Carl Schurz Union Army general, politician 1829 - 1906

Speech at the Chamber of Commerce, New York City, New York (2 January 1896)
Contesto: What is the rule of honor to be observed by a power so strongly and so advantageously situated as this Republic is? Of course I do not expect it meekly to pocket real insults if they should be offered to it. But, surely, it should not, as our boyish jingoes wish it to do, swagger about among the nations of the world, with a chip on its shoulder, shaking its fist in everybody's face. Of course, it should not tamely submit to real encroachments upon its rights. But, surely, it should not, whenever its own notions of right or interest collide with the notions of others, fall into hysterics and act as if it really feared for its own security and its very independence.
As a true gentleman, conscious of his strength and his dignity, it should be slow to take offense. In its dealings with other nations it should have scrupulous regard, not only for their rights, but also for their self-respect. With all its latent resources for war, it should be the great peace power of the world. It should never forget what a proud privilege and what an inestimable blessing it is not to need and not to have big armies or navies to support. It should seek to influence mankind, not by heavy artillery, but by good example and wise counsel. It should see its highest glory, not in battles won, but in wars prevented. It should be so invariably just and fair, so trustworthy, so good tempered, so conciliatory, that other nations would instinctively turn to it as their mutual friend and the natural adjuster of their differences, thus making it the greatest preserver of the world's peace.
This is not a mere idealistic fancy. It is the natural position of this great republic among the nations of the earth. It is its noblest vocation, and it will be a glorious day for the United States when the good sense and the self-respect of the American people see in this their "manifest destiny." It all rests upon peace. Is not this peace with honor? There has, of late, been much loose speech about "Americanism." Is not this good Americanism? It is surely today the Americanism of those who love their country most. And I fervently hope that it will be and ever remain the Americanism of our children and our children's children.

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„I hate Americans; I hate America.“

—  Ariana Grande American singer-songwriter 1993

At a Los Angeles doughnut shop http://friesian.com/antiam.htm (4 July 2015), as quoted in "Ariana Grande: 'I Hate Americans. I Hate America.'" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cb3i1dejBsI (8 July 2015), TMZ

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„There is what I call the American idea.“

—  Theodore Parker abolitionist 1810 - 1860

The American Idea https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Discourses_of_Slavery/Speech_in_Boston,_May_29,_1850,_on_Slave_Power_in_America, a speech at New England Anti-Slavery Convention, Boston (29 May 1850)
Variant : This is what I call the American idea of freedom — a government of all the people, by all the people, for all the people; of course, a government of the principles of eternal justice — the unchanging law of God.
As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, Both Ancient and Modern (1891) by Tryon Edwards, p. 17; an earlier statement of such sentiments was made by Benjamin Disraeli in Vivian Grey (1826), Book VI, Ch. 7: "all power is a trust; that we are accountable for its exercise; that from the people and for the people all springs, and all must exist." Parker was also very likely familiar with Daniel Webster's statements referring to "The people's government, made for the people, made by the people, and answerable to the people" in a speech on Foot's Resolution (26 January 1830); the most famous use of such phrasing came in Abraham Lincoln's, Gettysburg Address (19 November 1863) when using words probably inspired by Parker's he declared: "we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." Fifty eight years later, in 1921, Dr. Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925), Founder of Modern China, credited Lincoln's immortal words as the inspiration of his Three Principles of the People (三民主义) articulated in a speech delivered on March 6, 1921, at a meeting of the Executive Committee of the National People’s Party in Guangzhou. The Three Principles of the People are still enshrined in the Constitution of Taiwan. According to Lyon Sharman, "Sun Yat-sen: His Life and Its Meaning, a Critical Biography" (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1934), Dr. Sun wrote that his own three principles “correspond with the principles stated by President Lincoln—‘government of the people, by the people, for the people.’ I translated them into … the people (are) to have . . . the people (are) to govern and . . . the people (are) to enjoy.”
Contesto: There is what I call the American idea. I so name it, because it seems to me to lie at the basis of all our truly original, distinctive, and American institutions. It is itself a complex idea, composed of three subordinate and more simple ideas, namely: The idea that all men have unalienable rights; that in respect thereof, all men are created equal; and that government is to be established and sustained for the purpose of giving every man an opportunity for the enjoyment and development of all these unalienable rights. This idea demands, as the proximate organization thereof, a democracy, that is, a government of all the people, by all the people, for all the people; of course, a government after the principles of eternal justice, the unchanging law of God; for shortness' sake, I will call it the idea of Freedom.

„Damn Americans… I hate those bastards.“

—  Carolyn Parrish Canadian politician 1946

Recorded by an active microphone towards the end of a press scrum, Parrish later claimed her remark referred to the administration of George W. Bush and not the American people overall
As quoted in "MP apologizes for calling Americans 'bastards'" http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/mp-apologizes-for-calling-americans-bastards-1.361586 (27 February 2003), CBC News

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„I believe in an America where millions of Americans believe in an America that's the America millions of Americans believe in. That's the America I love.“

—  Mitt Romney American businessman and politician 1947

2012 stump speech, quoted in [2012-1-22, Steyn, Mark, The Man Who Gave Us Newt, National Review, http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/288873/man-who-gave-us-newt-mark-steyn, 2012-02-02]
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„There's nobody like Andy, and there never will be. He'll hate hearing this, but he's an American original.“

—  Andy Rooney writer, humorist, television personality 1919 - 2011

Jeff Fager, Chairman of CBS News and Executive Producer of 60 Minutes — quoted in CNN, Longtime CBS newsman Andy Rooney hospitalized, CNN Wire Staff, October 26, 2011, Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. http://www.cnn.com/2011/10/25/showbiz/andy-rooney-hospitalized/index.html,
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„It's time to reintroduce Americans to America.“

—  Bill Whittle author, director, screenwriter, editor 1959

citation needed

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