„What a horrible system we had. How blind we were.“

—  Hans Frank, To Leon Goldensohn, July 20, 1946, from "The Nuremberg Interviews" by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004
Hans Frank photo
Hans Frank
avvocato tedesco 1900 - 1946
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„The question suddenly came into my head, 'And if we were all blind?' And then immediately, as if answering myself, 'But we are all blind.“

—  José Saramago Portuguese writer and recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Literature 1928 - 2008
On the idea for his next novel (Blindness), which came to him while sitting in a restaurant; New York Times interview with Alan Riding (1998), as quoted in Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies, 6th Edition (Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture, 2001), p. 131.

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„How can we design improvement in large systems without understanding the whole system, and if we the answer is that we cannot, how is it possible to understand the whole system?“

—  C. West Churchman American philosopher and systems scientist 1913 - 2004
Context: It is only natural to expect that improvement can occur in certain sectors of the system without our having delved deeply into the characteristics of the whole system. Thus, for example, there is a tradition in Western thought that parts of the whole system can be studied and improved more or less in isolation from the rest of the system. So deeply ingrained is this concept of social improvement in Western thought that we naturally think it proper to subdivide our society into functional elements. We think it proper that each element develop its own criteria of improvement and that the elements be as free as possible from the interference of the other parts of the social structure... Men have neglected a very serious problem in defining improvement. The problem is very simple: How can we design improvement in large systems without understanding the whole system, and if we the answer is that we cannot, how is it possible to understand the whole system? p. 2 as cited in: John P. van Gigch (1991) System Design Modeling and Metamodeling. p. 145.

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„He paints for the blind, and we are the blind, and he lets us see for sure what we saw long ago but weren't sure we saw.“

—  William Saroyan American writer 1908 - 1981
Context: He paints for the blind, and we are the blind, and he lets us see for sure what we saw long ago but weren't sure we saw. He paints for the dead, to remind us that — great good God, think of it — we're alive, and on our way to weather, from the sea to the hot interior, to watermelon there, a bird at night chasing a child past flowering cactus, a building on fire, barking dogs, and guitar-players not playing at eight o'clock, every picture saying, "Did you live, man? Were you alive back there for a little while? Good for you, good for you, and wasn't it hot, though? Wasn't it great when it was hot, though?" On painter Rufino Tamayo.

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„We shall be judged by what we do, not by how we felt while we were doing it.“

—  Kenneth Tynan English theatre critic and writer 1927 - 1980
Review of Altona, by Jean-Paul Sartre (1961), p. 97

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„We will one day think it as horrible to eat animals as we now think it horrible to eat each other.“

—  Rose Scott Australian suffragist 1847 - 1925
Miscellaneous Notes, Scott Papers; as quoted in A New Australia: Citizenship, Radicalism and the First Republic by Bruce Scates (Cambridge University Press, 1997), p. 247 https://books.google.it/books?id=zkgeEmlRjEgC&pg=PA247.

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„That's what learning is, after all; not whether we lose the game, but how we lose and how we've changed because of it and what we take away from it that we never had before, to apply to other games.“

—  Richard Bach, The Bridge Across Forever: A True Love Story
Context: That's what learning is, after all; not whether we lose the game, but how we lose and how we've changed because of it and what we take away from it that we never had before, to apply to other games. Losing, in a curious way, is winning. Ch. 15

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