„The poet's matter being the hitherto experience of the world, and his own, increases with every century.“

Letter to Arthur Hugh Clough (December 1847/early 1848)
Contesto: Had Shakespeare and Milton lived in the atmosphere of modern feeling, had they had the multitude of new thoughts and feelings to deal with a modern has, I think it likely the style of each would have been far less curious and exquisite. For in a man style is the saying in the best way what you have to say. The what you have to say depends on your age. In the 17th century it was a smaller harvest than now, and sooner to be reaped; and therefore to its reaper was left time to stow it more finely and curiously. Still more was this the case in the ancient world. The poet's matter being the hitherto experience of the world, and his own, increases with every century.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 22 Maggio 2020. Storia
Matthew Arnold photo
Matthew Arnold6
poeta e critico letterario britannico 1822 - 1888

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