„Tom Paine has almost no influence on present-day thinking in the United States because he is unknown to the average citizen.“

— Thomas Alva Edison, Context: Tom Paine has almost no influence on present-day thinking in the United States because he is unknown to the average citizen. Perhaps I might say right here that this is a national loss and a deplorable lack of understanding concerning the man who first proposed and first wrote those impressive words, 'the United States of America.' But it is hardly strange. Paine's teachings have been debarred from schools everywhere and his views of life misrepresented until his memory is hidden in shadows, or he is looked upon as of unsound mind. We never had a sounder intelligence in this Republic. He was the equal of Washington in making American liberty possible. Where Washington performed Paine devised and wrote. The deeds of one in the Weld were matched by the deeds of the other with his pen.
Thomas Alva Edison photo
Thomas Alva Edison15
inventore e imprenditore statunitense 1847 - 1931
Pubblicità

Citazioni simili

Robert H. Jackson photo
James Wilson photo

„To the Constitution of the United States the term, is totally unknown.“

— James Wilson one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence 1742 - 1798
Chisholm v. Georgia, 2 U.S. (2 Dallas) 419 (1793), at 454.

Pubblicità
Jacques Ellul photo
Thomas Jefferson photo

„Louisiana, as ceded by France to the United States, is made a part of the United States; its white inhabitants shall be citizens, and stand, as to their rights and obligations, on the same footing with other citizens of the United States, in analogous situations.“

— Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826
Draft of proposed Amendment to the Constitution by Jefferson, who thought an amendment would be necessary to authorize the Louisiana Purchase to be incorporated into the United States (August 1803)

Morrison Waite photo
Gianfranco Fini photo

„I don't think that the United States are ready for a presidency as the one of Obama, at least because he would be the first black president.“

— Gianfranco Fini Italian politician 1952
interview http://www.rai.tv/mppopupvideo/0,,News%5E0%5E64456,0.html by Gianni Riotta Tv7, RaiUno channel, 7 March 2008.

Pubblicità
Frederick Douglass photo
Alan Keyes photo
Hu Jintao photo

„Both China and the United States are countries of significant influence in the world.“

— Hu Jintao former General Secretary of the Communist Party of China 1942
Context: Both China and the United States are countries of significant influence in the world. We share important common strategic interests in a wide range of areas, including economic cooperation and trade, security, public health, energy, and environmental protection, and on major international and regional issues. In particular, mutually beneficial and win-win China-U. S. economic cooperation and trade benefit our two peoples and promote the economic growth in the Asia Pacific region and the world at large. Indeed, they have become an important foundation for China-U. S. relations.

Lyndon B. Johnson photo
Pubblicità
Abraham Lincoln photo

„I never tire of reading Tom Paine.“

— Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865
As quoted in A Literary History of the American People‎ (1931) by Charles Angoff, p. 270

John Marshall Harlan photo

„I cannot see but that, according to the principles this day announced, such state legislation, although conceived in hostility to, and enacted for the purpose of humiliating, citizens of the United States of a particular race, would be held to be consistent with the Constitution“

— John Marshall Harlan United States Union Army officer and Supreme Court Associate Justice 1833 - 1911
Context: A State cannot, consistently with the Constitution of the United States, prevent white and black citizens, having the required qualifications for jury service, from sitting in the same jury box, it is now solemnly held that a State may prohibit white and black citizens from sitting in the same passenger coach on a public highway, or may require that they be separated by a 'partition', when in the same passenger coach. May it not now be reasonably expected that astute men of the dominant race, who affect to be disturbed at the possibility that the integrity of the white race may be corrupted, or that its supremacy will be imperiled, by contact on public highways with black people, will endeavor to procure statutes requiring white and black jurors to be separated in the jury box by a 'partition', and that, upon retiring from the courtroom to consult as to their verdict, such partition, if it be a moveable one, shall be taken to their consultation room and set up in such way as to prevent black jurors from coming too close to their brother jurors of the white race. If the 'partition' used in the courtroom happens to be stationary, provision could be made for screens with openings through which jurors of the two races could confer as to their verdict without coming into personal contact with each other. I cannot see but that, according to the principles this day announced, such state legislation, although conceived in hostility to, and enacted for the purpose of humiliating, citizens of the United States of a particular race, would be held to be consistent with the Constitution.

Thomas Edison photo

„It is probable that we should have had the Revolution without Tom Paine. Certainly it could not be forestalled, once he had spoken.“

— Thomas Edison American inventor and businessman 1847 - 1931
Context: Looking back to those times we cannot, without much reading, clearly gauge the sentiment of the Colonies. Perhaps the larger number of responsible men still hoped for peace with England. They did not even venture to express the matter that way. Few men, indeed, had thought in terms of war. Then Paine wrote 'Common Sense,' an anonymous tract which immediately stirred the fires of liberty. It flashed from hand to hand throughout the Colonies. One copy reached the New York Assembly, in session at Albany, and a night meeting was voted to answer this unknown writer with his clarion call to liberty. The Assembly met, but could find no suitable answer. Tom Paine had inscribed a document which never has been answered adversely, and never can be, so long as man esteems his priceless possession. In 'Common Sense' Paine flared forth with a document so powerful that the Revolution became inevitable. Washington recognized the difference, and in his calm way said that matters never could be the same again.. It must be remembered that 'Common Sense' preceded the declaration and affirmed the very principles that went into the national doctrine of liberty. But that affirmation was made with more vigor, more of the fire of the patriot and was exactly suited to the hour. It is probable that we should have had the Revolution without Tom Paine. Certainly it could not be forestalled, once he had spoken.

Barack Obama photo
Avanti