„To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing.“

The Shape of the Fire," ll. 88-92
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948)
Contesto: To stare into the after-light, the glitter left on the lake's surface,
When the sun has fallen behind a wooded island;
To follow the drips sliding from a lifted oar
Held up, while the rower breathes, and the small boat drifts quietly shoreward;
To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing.

Theodore Roethke photo
Theodore Roethke6
poeta e scrittore statunitense 1908 - 1963

Citazioni simili

Abdel Fattah el-Sisi photo

„Don’t you know that you are the light of our eyes?“

—  Abdel Fattah el-Sisi Current President of Egypt 1954

El-Sisi addressing the Egyptians in a common Arabic expression of love to show how much the Egyptian Armed Forces love the Egyptians.
As reported in Al Arabiya, 20 Dec 2013 http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/features/2013/12/20/Egypt-Leaks-help-not-hurt-el-Sissi-s-image.html
2013

Stephen King photo

„In the star-filled dark we cook
Our macaroni and eat
By lantern light. Stars cluster
Around our table like fireflies.“

—  Kenneth Rexroth American poet, writer, anarchist, academic and conscientious objector 1905 - 1982

In Defense of the Earth (1956), The Great Nebula of Andromeda

Edna O'Brien photo
Joss Whedon photo

„As we all know, blinking lights means science.“

—  Joss Whedon American director, writer, and producer for television and film 1964

„There is no light for those who do not know darkness.“

—  Takehiko Inoue Japanese artist 1967

Source: Takehiko Inoue Quotes https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/147221.Takehiko_Inoue

Ursula K. Le Guin photo
Charles Bukowski photo
Ayn Rand photo

„He stepped to the window and pointed to the skyscrapers of the city. He said that we had to extinguish the lights of the world, and when we would see the lights of New York go out, we would know that our job was done.“

—  Ayn Rand, libro La rivolta di Atlante

The Fountainhead (1943).
Origine: Atlas Shrugged
Contesto: That particular sense of sacred rapture men say they experience in contemplating nature- I've never received it from nature, only from. Buildings, Skyscrapers. I would give the greatest sunset in the world for one sight of New York's skyline. The shapes and the thought that made them. The sky over New York and the will of man made visible. What other religion do we need? And then people tell me about pilgrimages to some dank pest-hole in a jungle where they go to do homage to a crumbling temple, to a leering stone monster with a pot belly, created by some leprous savage. Is it beauty and genius they want to see? Do they seek a sense of the sublime? Let them come to New York, stand on the shore of the Hudson, look and kneel. When I see the city from my window - no, I don't feel how small I am - but I feel that if a war came to threaten this, I would like to throw myself into space, over the city, and protect these buildings with my body.

Paulo Coelho photo
Stephen Fry photo

„But because science doesn't know everything, that doesn't mean science knows nothing. Science knows enough for us to be watched by a few million people now on television, for these lights to be working, for quite extraordinary miracles to have taken place in terms of the harnessing of the physical world and our dim approaches towards understanding it.“

—  Stephen Fry English comedian, actor, writer, presenter, and activist 1957

Room 101 (2001) Season 6 Episode 10
2000s
Contesto: The key word for me (my spleen isn't really big enough to explode with all the splenetic juices of fury that drive me when I consider this), but the real key word that triggers my rage is the word 'energy', when people start talking about it in terms of negative or positive types. For instance, "there's very negative energy in here." What are you talking about? What do you mean? I mean, let's think about it. What does energy mean? Well, we know what it means: energy from petrol when it's burned, it moves the car. "This room has positive energy" — well, where the fuck's it going then? It's not moving. It's covering up such woolly thinking, such pathetic nonsense. And astrology: most people will say of astrology, "Well, it's harmless fun." And I should say that for 80% of the cases it probably is harmless fun, but there's a strong way in which it isn't harmless. One, because it is so anti-science. You will hear things like, "Science doesn't know everything." Well, of course science doesn't know everything. But because science doesn't know everything, that doesn't mean science knows nothing. Science knows enough for us to be watched by a few million people now on television, for these lights to be working, for quite extraordinary miracles to have taken place in terms of the harnessing of the physical world and our dim approaches towards understanding it. And as Wittgenstein quite rightly said, "When we understand every single secret of the universe, there will still be left the eternal mystery of the human heart."

Mike Oldfield photo
Kate DiCamillo photo

„What's left is light as a seed;
I need an old crone's knowing.“

—  Theodore Roethke American poet 1908 - 1963

"Meditations of an Old Woman: First Meditation," ll. 15-21
Words for the Wind (1958)
Contesto: How can I rest in the days of my slowness?
I've become a strange piece of flesh,
Nervous and cold, bird-furtive, whiskery,
With a cheek soft as a hound's ear.
What's left is light as a seed;
I need an old crone's knowing.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x