„The divine is everywhere, even in a grain of sand“

Quote of Friedrich on his painting Swans in the Rushes (c. 1820), as cited in "Absent Presences in Liminal Places: Murnau's Nosferatu and the Otherworld of Stoker's Dracula" by Saviour Catania in Literature Film Quarterly (2004) http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3768/is_200401/ai_n9377557/print
1794 - 1840
Contesto: The divine is everywhere, even in a grain of sand; there I represented it in the reeds.

Caspar David Friedrich photo
Caspar David Friedrich3
pittore tedesco 1774 - 1840

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„We call it a grain of sand
but it calls itself neither grain nor sand.“

—  Wisława Szymborska Polish writer 1923 - 2012

"View with a Grain of Sand"
Poems New and Collected (1998), The People on the Bridge (1986)
Contesto: We call it a grain of sand
but it calls itself neither grain nor sand.
It does just fine without a name,
whether general, particular,
permanent, passing,
incorrect or apt.

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„Sometimes, that mountain you've been climbing, is just a grain of sand.“

—  Carrie Underwood American country music singer 1983

From her hit single, So Small from the album, Carnival Ride (2007).

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„Those worlds in space are as countless as all the grains of sand on all the beaches of the earth.“

—  Carl Sagan American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science educator 1934 - 1996

54 min 55 sec
Cosmos: A Personal Voyage (1990 Update), Journeys in Space and Time [Episode 8]
Contesto: Those worlds in space are as countless as all the grains of sand on all the beaches of the earth. Each of those worlds is as real as ours and every one of them is a succession of incidents, events, occurrences which influence its future. Countless worlds, numberless moments, an immensity of space and time. And our small planet at this moment, here we face a critical branch point in history, what we do with our world, right now, will propagate down through the centuries and powerfully affect the destiny of our descendants, it is well within our power to destroy our civilization and perhaps our species as well. If we capitulate to superstition or greed or stupidity we could plunge our world into a time of darkness deeper than the time between the collapse of classical civilization and the Italian Renaissance. But we are also capable of using our compassion and our intelligence, our technology and our wealth to make an abundant and meaningful life for every inhabitant of this planet.

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„I am hanging in the balance of the reality of man
Like every sparrow falling, like every grain of sand“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, Shot of Love (1981), Every Grain Of Sand
Variante: "I am hanging in the balance of a perfect, finished plan" (The Bootleg Series, Vols. 1–3)

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„In the fury of the moment I can see the Master's hand
In every leaf that trembles, in every grain of sand“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, Shot of Love (1981), Every Grain Of Sand

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„When the beginnings of self-destruction enter the heart it seems no bigger than a grain of sand.“

—  John Cheever American novelist and short story writer 1912 - 1982

The Late Forties and the Fifties, 1952 entry.

„Can we find "The Universe in a grain of sand"? Well perhaps, but a stone seems easier to visualize.“

—  Peter J. Carroll British occultist 1953

Origine: The Apophenion (2008), p. 11; this makes reference to William Blake's Auguries of Innocence: "To see the world in a grain of sand…"

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„To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.“

—  William Blake, Auguries of Innocence

Variante: To see a World in a grain of sand,
And a Heaven in a wild flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand,
And Eternity in an hour.
Origine: 1800s, Auguries of Innocence (1803), Line 1

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Fyodor Dostoyevsky photo

„Love a man even in his sin, for that is the semblance of Divine Love and is the highest love on earth. Love all God's creation, the whole of it and every grain of sand in it. Love every leaf, every ray of God's light. Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, you will perceive the divine mystery in things. Once you have perceived it, you will begin to comprehend it better every day, and you will come at last to love the world with an all-embracing love.“

—  Fyodor Dostoyevsky Russian author 1821 - 1881

Book VI, chapter 3: "Conversations and Exhortations of Father Zossima; Of Prayer, of Love, and of Contact with other Worlds" (translated by Constance Garnett)
The Brothers Karamazov (1879–1880)
Contesto: Brothers, have no fear of men's sin. Love a man even in his sin, for that is the semblance of Divine Love and is the highest love on earth. Love all God's creation, the whole of it and every grain of sand in it. Love every leaf, every ray of God's light. Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, you will perceive the divine mystery in things. Once you have perceived it, you will begin to comprehend it better every day, and you will come at last to love the world with an all-embracing love. Love the animals: God has given them the rudiments of thought and untroubled joy. So do not trouble it, do not harass them, do not deprive them of their joy, do not go against God's intent. Man, do not exhale yourself above the animals: they are without sin, while you in your majesty defile the earth by your appearance on it, and you leave the traces of your defilement behind you — alas, this is true of almost every one of us! Love children especially, for like the angels they too are sinless, and they live to soften and purify our hearts, and, as it were, to guide us. Woe to him who offends a child.
My young brother asked even the birds to forgive him. It may sound absurd, but it is right none the less, for everything, like the ocean, flows and enters into contact with everything else: touch one place, and you set up a movement at the other end of the world. It may be senseless to beg forgiveness of the birds, but, then, it would be easier for the birds, and for the child, and for every animal if you were yourself more pleasant than you are now. Everything is like an ocean, I tell you. Then you would pray to the birds, too, consumed by a universal love, as though in ecstasy, and ask that they, too, should forgive your sin. Treasure this ecstasy, however absurd people may think it.

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„I found folly everywhere, but there were grains of wisdom in every stream of it. No doubt there was much more wisdom that I failed to recognize.“

—  Philip Pullman, His Dark Materials trilogy

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Contesto: "You have a strange way about you, Dr. Grumman. You ever spend any time among the witches?"
"Yes," said Grumman. "And among academicians, and among spirits. I found folly everywhere, but there were grains of wisdom in every stream of it. No doubt there was much more wisdom that I failed to recognize. Life is hard, Mr. Scoresby, but we cling to it all the same."
"And this journey we're on? Is that folly or wisdom?"
"The greatest wisdom I know."
"Tell me again what your purpose is. You're going to find the bearer of this subtle knife, and what then?"
"Tell him what his task is."
"And that's a task that includes protecting Lyra," the aeronaut reminded him.
"It will protect all of us."

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„Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean
And the pleasant land. Thus the little minutes,
Humble though they be,
Make the mighty ages
Of eternity.“

—  Julia Abigail Fletcher Carney, Little Things

"Little Things" in the Myrtle (1845). This poem came to be published uncredited as a children's rhyme and hymn in many 19th century magazines and books, sometimes becoming variously attributed to Ebenezer Cobham Brewer, Daniel Clement Colesworthy, and Frances S. Osgood, but the earliest publications of it clearly are those of Carney, according to Our Woman Workers: Biographical Sketches of Women Eminent in the Universalist Church for Literary, Philanthropic and Christian Work (1881) by E. R. Hanson, as well as Familiar Quotations 9th edition (1906) edited by John Bartlett, The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (1999) by Elizabeth Knowles and Angela Partington, and The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), ed. Fred R. Shapiro.

Henrik Ibsen photo

„There must be ghosts all over the world. They must be as countless as the grains of the sands, it seems to me. And we are so miserably afraid of the light, all of us.“

—  Henrik Ibsen Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet 1828 - 1906

Mrs. Alving, Act II
Ghosts (1881)
Contesto: I am half inclined to think we are all ghosts, Mr. Manders. It is not only what we have inherited from our fathers and mothers that exists again in us, but all sorts of old dead ideas and all kinds of old dead beliefs and things of that kind. They are not actually alive in us; but there they are dormant, all the same, and we can never be rid of them. Whenever I take up a newspaper and read it, I fancy I see ghosts creeping between the lines. There must be ghosts all over the world. They must be as countless as the grains of the sands, it seems to me. And we are so miserably afraid of the light, all of us.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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