„Cease therefore to be dismayed by the mere novelty and so to reject reason from your mind with loathing: weigh the questions rather with keen judgment and if they seem to you to be true, surrender, or if the thing is false, gird yourself to the encounter.“

Book II, lines 1040–1043 (tr. Munro)
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things)
Originale: (la) Desine qua propter novitate exterritus ipsa
expuere ex animo rationem, sed magis acri
iudicio perpende, et si tibi vera videntur,
dede manus, aut, si falsum est, accingere contra.

Ultimo aggiornamento 24 Maggio 2020. Storia
Tito Lucrezio Caro photo
Tito Lucrezio Caro37
poeta e filosofo romano -94 - -55 a.C.

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—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986

Origine: 1970s, p. 56
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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“