„In addition to the teaching of truths the Law aims at the removal of injustice from mankind.“

—  Mosè Maimonide, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Origine: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.32
Contesto: The chief object of the Law, as has been shown by us, is the teaching of truths; to which the truth of the creatio ex nihilo belongs. It is known that the object of the law of Sabbath is to confirm and to establish this principle, as we have shown in this treatise (Part II. chap. xxxi.) In addition to the teaching of truths the Law aims at the removal of injustice from mankind. We have thus proved that the first laws do not refer to burnt-offering and sacrifice, which are of secondary importance.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 15 Luglio 2021. Storia
Mosè Maimonide photo
Mosè Maimonide6
filosofo, rabbino e medico ebraico 1138 - 1204

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