„Why do we live? Most of us need the very thing we never ask for.“

Letter to Robert McAlmon (4 September 1943), published in The Selected Letters of William Carlos Williams (1957) edited by John C. Thirlwall, p. 217
General sources
Contesto: Why do we live? Most of us need the very thing we never ask for. We talk about revolution as if it was peanuts. What we need is some frank thinking and a few revolutions in our own guts; to hell with what most of the sons of bitches that I know and myself along with them if I don't take hold of myself and turn about when I need to — or go ahead further if that's the game.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
William Carlos Williams photo
William Carlos Williams9
poeta, romanziere e medico statunitense 1883 - 1963

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