„If you want the exact moment in time, it was conceived mentally on 8th March in this year one thousand six hundred and eighteen, but submitted to calculation in an unlucky way, and therefore rejected as false, and finally returning on the 15th of May and adopting a new line of attack, stormed the darkness of my mind.“

—  Giovanni Keplero, libro Harmonices Mundi

Book V, Ch. 3 dates that his Third Law of Planetary Motion occurred to him, translation by E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan, and J. V. Field, The Harmony of the World (1997), Vol. 209, p. 411
Variant translation: A fresh assault overcame the darkness of my reason...
As quoted in Calculus. Multivariable (2006) by Steven G. Krantz and Brian E. Blank. p. 126
Harmonices Mundi (1618)
Contesto: If you want the exact moment in time, it was conceived mentally on 8th March in this year one thousand six hundred and eighteen, but submitted to calculation in an unlucky way, and therefore rejected as false, and finally returning on the 15th of May and adopting a new line of attack, stormed the darkness of my mind. So strong was the support from the combination of my labour of seventeen years on the observations of Brahe and the present study, which conspired together, that at first I believed I was dreaming, and assuming my conclusion among my basic premises. But it is absolutely certain and exact that "the proportion between the periodic times of any two planets is precisely the sesquialterate proportion of their mean distances..."

Giovanni Keplero photo
Giovanni Keplero10
astronomo, matematico e musicista tedesco 1571 - 1630

Citazioni simili

Smedley D. Butler photo
Meg Cabot photo
Upton Sinclair photo
Benjamin Creme photo
Paul Erdős photo
Lucretius photo

„Cease therefore to be dismayed by the mere novelty and so to reject reason from your mind with loathing: weigh the questions rather with keen judgment and if they seem to you to be true, surrender, or if the thing is false, gird yourself to the encounter.“

—  Lucretius Roman poet and philosopher -94 - -55 a.C.

Book II, lines 1040–1043 (tr. Munro)
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things)
Originale: (la) Desine qua propter novitate exterritus ipsa
expuere ex animo rationem, sed magis acri
iudicio perpende, et si tibi vera videntur,
dede manus, aut, si falsum est, accingere contra.

Arthur C. Clarke photo
Sam Walter Foss photo
Benjamin Disraeli photo
Ivan Van Sertima photo
Carl Sagan photo
Sri Aurobindo photo

„There are no true and false religions, but rather all religions are true in their own way and degree. Each is one of the thousand paths to the One Eternal.“

—  Sri Aurobindo Indian nationalist, freedom fighter, philosopher, yogi, guru and poet 1872 - 1950

Indian Spirituality and Life (1919)
Contesto: To the Indian mind the least important part of religion is its dogma; the religious spirit matters, not the theological credo. On the contrary to the Western mind a fixed intellectual belief is the most important part of a cult; it is its core of meaning, it is the thing that distinguishes it from others. For it is its formulated beliefs that make it either a true or a false religion, according as it agrees or does not agree with the credo of its critic. This notion, however foolish and shallow, is a necessary consequence of the Western idea which falsely supposes that intellectual truth is the highest verity and, even, that there is no other. The Indian religious thinker knows that all the highest eternal verities are truths of the spirit. The supreme truths are neither the rigid conclusions of logical reasoning nor the affirmations of credal statement, but fruits of the soul's inner experience. Intellectual truth is only one of the doors to the outer precincts of the temple. And since intellectual truth turned towards the Infinite must be in its very nature many-sided and not narrowly one, the most varying intellectual beliefs can be equally true because they mirror different facets of the Infinite. However separated by intellectual distance, they still form so many side-entrances which admit the mind to some faint ray from a supreme Light. There are no true and false religions, but rather all religions are true in their own way and degree. Each is one of the thousand paths to the One Eternal.

William Hazlitt photo

„The way to procure insults is to submit to them. A man meets with no more respect than he exacts.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830

No. 402
Characteristics, in the manner of Rochefoucauld's Maxims (1823)

Napoleon Hill photo
Diana Gabaldon photo
Benjamin Creme photo
Peter Medawar photo
William Augustus Muhlenberg photo

„I would not live alway: I ask not to stay
Where storm after storm rises dark o’er the way.“

—  William Augustus Muhlenberg United States Anglican Episcopal clergyman 1796 - 1877

I would not live alway (published 1826), reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“