„Famine and gluttony alike drive nature away from the heart of man.“

—  Theodore Parker, Context: Wealth and want equally harden the human heart, like frost and fire both are alien to human flesh. Famine and gluttony alike drive nature away from the heart of man. As quoted in Treasury of Thought : Forming an Encyclopædia of Quotations from Ancient and Modern Authors (1894) edited by Martin M. Ballou, p. 231.
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Theodore Parker
pastore protestante e predicatore statunitense 1810 - 1860
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„Drive the natural away, it returns at a gallop.“

—  Philippe Néricault Destouches French playwright 1680 - 1754
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„By association with nature's enormities, a man's heart may truly grow big also.“

—  Lin Yutang Chinese writer 1895 - 1976
Context: By association with nature's enormities, a man's heart may truly grow big also. There is a way of looking upon a landscape as a moving picture and being satisfied with nothing less big as a moving picture, a way of looking upon tropic clouds over the horizon as the backdrop of a stage and being satisfied with nothing less big as a backdrop, a way of looking upon the mountain forests as a private garden and being satisfied with nothing less as a private garden, a way of listening to the roaring waves as a concert and being satisfied with nothing less as a concert, and a way of looking upon the mountain breeze as an air-cooling system and being satisfied with nothing less as an air-cooling system. So do we become big, even as the earth and firmaments are big. Like the "Big Man" described by Yuan Tsi (A. D. 210-263), one of China's first romanticists, we "live in heaven and earth as our house." p. 282

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„Nature, with equal mind,
Sees all her sons at play
Sees man control the wind,
The wind sweep man away.“

—  Matthew Arnold English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools 1822 - 1888
Act I, sc. ii

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„I choose the ascending path because my heart drives me toward it.“

—  Nikos Kazantzakis Greek writer 1883 - 1957
Context: Which of the two eternal roads shall I choose? Suddenly I know that my whole life hangs on this decision — the life of the entire Universe. Of the two, I choose the ascending path. Why? For no intelligible reason, without any certainty; I know how ineffectual the mind and all the small certainties of man can be in this moment of crisis. I choose the ascending path because my heart drives me toward it. "Upward! Upward! Upward!" my heart shouts, and I follow it trustingly.

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„Unconscionable Love,
To what extremes will you not drive our hearts!“

—  Virgil Ancient Roman poet -70 - -19 a.C.
Line 412 (tr. Fitzgerald) Compare: Σχέτλι᾽ Ἔρως, μέγα πῆμα, μέγα στύγος ἀνθρώποισιν, ἐκ σέθεν οὐλόμεναί τ᾽ ἔριδες στοναχαί τε γόοι τε, ἄλγεά τ᾽ ἄλλ᾽ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν ἀπείρονα τετρήχασιν. Unconscionable Love, bane and tormentor of mankind, parent of strife, fountain of tears, source of a thousand ills. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, IV, 445–447 (tr. E. V. Rieu)

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