„Inscribe all human effort with one word“

—  Robert Browning, The Ring and the Book

Book XI, line 1560.
The Ring and the Book (1868-69)
Contesto: Inscribe all human effort with one word,
Artistry's haunting curse, the Incomplete!

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 22 Maggio 2020. Storia
Robert Browning photo
Robert Browning3
poeta e drammaturgo britannico 1812 - 1889

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