„It is not the ultimate fate of Richard Nixon that most concerns me“

1970s, Remarks on pardoning Nixon (1974)
Contesto: It is not the ultimate fate of Richard Nixon that most concerns me, though surely it deeply troubles every decent and every compassionate person. My concern is the immediate future of this great country.
In this, I dare not depend upon my personal sympathy as a long-time friend of the former President, nor my professional judgment as a lawyer, and I do not.
As President, my primary concern must always be the greatest good of all the people of the United States whose servant I am. As a man, my first consideration is to be true to my own convictions and my own conscience.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
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Gerald Ford1
38º presidente degli Stati Uniti d'America 1913 - 2006

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—  Stephen King American author 1947

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„Man is ultimately concerned about that which determines his ultimate destiny beyond all preliminary necessities and accidents.“

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„Most of these poems are concerned with the linguistic impossibility of telling truth.“

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—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

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24 April 1929 in response to the telegrammed question of New York's Rabbi Herbert S. Goldstein: "Do you believe in God? Stop. Answer paid 50 words." Einstein replied in only 27 (German) words. The New York Times 25 April 1929 http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F10B1EFC3E54167A93C7AB178FD85F4D8285F9
Similarly, in a letter to Maurice Solovine, he wrote: "I can understand your aversion to the use of the term 'religion' to describe an emotional and psychological attitude which shows itself most clearly in Spinoza... I have not found a better expression than 'religious' for the trust in the rational nature of reality that is, at least to a certain extent, accessible to human reason."
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