„Science is built up with facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.“

—  Henri Poincaré, Context: The Scientist must set in order. Science is built up with facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house. Ch. IX: Hypotheses in Physics, Tr. George Bruce Halsted (1913)
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Henri Poincaré12
matematico, fisico e filosofo francese 1854 - 1912
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„These houses are intended to have stone walls.“

—  Ernest Flagg American architect 1857 - 1947
Context: These houses are intended to have stone walls.... The fact that a stone house is better in many ways than a wooden one, and also more economical in the long run has, for the most part, been overlooked... The conditions are... ripe for a change from wood to stone or other incombustible material, but it will doubtless come about slowly.<!-- Introduction

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„A good, square, stone house, placed on an eminence, facing the Bishop's Palace at Auckland.“

—  Henry George Liddell Headmaster, lexicographer, classical scholar, and dean 1811 - 1898
Of the house where he was born, p. 25.

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„And three lucky stones strung on a wire to keep the house safe.“

—  Annie Proulx American novelist, short story and non-fiction author 1935
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„192. Whose house is of glasse must not throw stones at another.“

—  George Herbert Welsh-born English poet, orator and Anglican priest 1593 - 1633

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„The most important thing in this world is liberty. More important than food or clothes — more important than gold or houses or lands — more important than art or science — more important than all religions, is the liberty of man.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899
Context: I want you to understand what has been done in the world to force men to think alike. It seems to me that if there is some infinite being who wants us to think alike he would have made us alike. Why did he not do so? Why did he make your brain so that you could not by any possibility be a Methodist? Why did he make yours so that you could not be a Catholic? And why did he make the brain of another so that he is an unbeliever — why the brain of another so that he became a Mohammedan — if he wanted us all to believe alike? After all, maybe Nature is good enough and grand enough and broad enough to give us the diversity born of liberty. Maybe, after all, it would not be best for us all to be just the same. What a stupid world, if everybody said yes to everything that everybody else might say. The most important thing in this world is liberty. More important than food or clothes — more important than gold or houses or lands — more important than art or science — more important than all religions, is the liberty of man.

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„The fall of meteoric stones was occasionally reported by good witnesses during many ages. But science did not understand how stones should be formed in or beyond the atmosphere“

—  Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802) Scottish publisher and writer 1802 - 1871
Context: The fall of meteoric stones was occasionally reported by good witnesses during many ages. But science did not understand how stones should be formed in or beyond the atmosphere... The accounts of the fall of meteoric stones were held to be incompatible with the laws of nature, and specimens which had been seen to fall by hundreds of people were preserved in cabinets of natural history as ordinary minerals, 'which the credulous and superstitious regarded as having fallen from the clouds.' A committee of the French Academy of Sciences, including the celebrated Lavoisier, unanimously rejected an account of three nearly contemporary descents of meteorites which reached them on the strongest evidence. After two thousand years of incredulity, the truth in this matter was forced upon the scientific world about the beginning of the present century. There would have been at any time, of course, an instant cessation of skepticism if any one could have shewn, a priori, from ascertained principles in connection with the atmosphere, how stones were to be expected to fall from the sky. But what is this but to say that facts by themselves, however well attested, are wholly useless in such circumstances to the cultivators of physical science, while any kind of vague hypothesis can be brought forward in opposition to them? What is it but to put conjecture or prejudice above fact, and indeed utterly to repudiate the Baconian method? p. 10

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„A heap of bricks is not yet a house.“

—  Isaac Leib Peretz Yiddish language author and playwright 1852 - 1915
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„I wake up in a house that was built by slaves.“

—  Michelle Obama lawyer, writer, wife of Barack Obama and former First Lady of the United States 1964
Remarks by the First Lady at City College of New York Commencement https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/06/03/remarks-first-lady-city-college-new-york-commencement (3 June 2016); quoted in "Michelle Obama: Every Day, 'I Wake Up in a House That Was Built by Slaves'" http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/06/04/michelle-obama-every-day-i-wake-up-in-house-built-slaves/ by Jeremy Hudson, Breitbart (4 June 2016)

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„If you live in a glass house, don't be chucking stuff about. - Karl interprets the phrase Those who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.“

—  Karl Pilkington English television personality, social commentator, actor, author and former radio producer 1972
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