„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

—  John Donne, libro Holy Sonnets

No. 10, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Contesto: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 22 Maggio 2020. Storia
John Donne photo
John Donne10
poeta e religioso inglese 1572 - 1631

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