„Not till the hours of light return
All we have built do we discern.“

"Morality" (1852), lines 7-12
Contesto: With aching hands and bleeding feet
We dig and heap, lay stone on stone;
We bear the burden and the heat
Of the long day and wish’t were done.
Not till the hours of light return
All we have built do we discern.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 22 Maggio 2020. Storia
Matthew Arnold photo
Matthew Arnold6
poeta e critico letterario britannico 1822 - 1888

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