„Man consists in Truth. If he exposes Truth, he exposes himself. If he betrays Truth, he betrays himself.“

—  Novalis

Contesto: Man consists in Truth. If he exposes Truth, he exposes himself. If he betrays Truth, he betrays himself. We speak not here of lies, but of acting against Conviction.

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
Novalis photo
Novalis51
poeta e teologo tedesco 1772 - 1801

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