„The atomic bomb had dwarfed the international issues to complete insignificance.“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The World Set Free

The World Set Free (1913)
Contesto: The atomic bomb had dwarfed the international issues to complete insignificance. When our minds wandered from the preoccupations of our immediate needs, we speculated upon the possibility of stopping the use of these frightful explosives before the world was utterly destroyed. For to us it seemed quite plain that these bombs and the still greater power of destruction of which they were the precursors might quite easily shatter every relationship and institution of mankind... war must end and that the only way to end war was to have but one government for mankind.

H. G. Wells photo
H. G. Wells22
scrittore britannico 1866 - 1946

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Albert Einstein photo

„Had I known that the Germans would not succeed in producing an atomic bomb, I would not have lifted a finger.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Einstein discussing the letter he sent Roosevelt raising the possibility of atomic weapons. from "Atom: Einstein, the Man Who Started It All," Newsweek Magazine (10 March 1947).
1940s

Ernest King photo

„I didn't like the atom bomb or any part of it.“

—  Ernest King United States Navy admiral, Chief of Naval Operations 1878 - 1956

King's comment to Commander Whitehill on July 4, 1950, which was transcribed in Whitehill's notes. As quoted in The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (1995) by Gar Alperovitz, p. 321

Vyacheslav Molotov photo

„Someone helped us a lot with the atomic bomb.“

—  Vyacheslav Molotov Soviet politician and diplomat 1890 - 1986

Statement about Julius and Ethel Rosenberg having performed espionage for the Soviet Union, as quoted in The FBI-KGB War : A Special Agent's Story (1995), by Robert J. Lamphere and Tom Shachtman, p. 306
Contesto: Someone helped us a lot with the atomic bomb. The intelligence (service) played a huge role. These Rosenbergs suffered in America. It is not excluded that they helped us. But we shouldn't really speak about it, because we might receive this kind of help in the future.

Harry Truman photo

„The atomic bomb is too dangerous to be loose in a lawless world.“

—  Harry Truman American politician, 33rd president of the United States (in office from 1945 to 1953) 1884 - 1972

Report on the Potsdam Conference (1945)
Contesto: The atomic bomb is too dangerous to be loose in a lawless world. That is why Great Britain, Canada, and the United States, who have the secret of its production, do not intend to reveal that secret until means have been found to control the bomb so as to protect ourselves and the rest of the world from the danger of total destruction.

Curtis LeMay photo

„In the Baruch proposal our government suggested the creation of the International Authority by the United Nations to which would be given a complete monopoly of all atomic installations, materials and stockpiles.“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957

also see The Baruch Plan http://www.atomicarchive.com/History/mp/p6s5.shtml
What Does God Want Us to Do About Russia? (1948)
Contesto: In the Baruch proposal our government suggested the creation of the International Authority by the United Nations to which would be given a complete monopoly of all atomic installations, materials and stockpiles. This authority should be given power of inspection and power to call for the punishment of violators.

Alan Moore photo

„I believe in some sort of strange fashion that the presence of the atom bomb might almost be forcing a level of human development that wouldn’t have occurred without the presence of the atom bomb.“

—  Alan Moore English writer primarily known for his work in comic books 1953

On the issue of nuclear weapons, in England Their England : Monsters, Maniacs and Moore (1987) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hv44V4d_fDQ
Contesto: It doesn’t even matter if we ever fire these missiles or not. They are having their effect upon us because there is a generation growing up now who cannot see past the final exclamation mark of a mushroom cloud. They are a generation who can see no moral values that do not end in a crackling crater somewhere. I’m not saying that nuclear bombs are at the root of all of it, but I think it is very, very naïve to assume that you can expose the entire population of the world to the threat of being turned to cinders without them starting to act, perhaps, a little oddly.
I believe in some sort of strange fashion that the presence of the atom bomb might almost be forcing a level of human development that wouldn’t have occurred without the presence of the atom bomb. Maybe this degree of terror will force changes in human attitudes that could not have occurred without the presence of these awful, destructive things. Perhaps we are faced with a race between the Four Horseman of the Apocalypse in one line and the 7th Cavalry in the other. We have not got an awful lot of mid ground between Utopia and Apocalypse, and if somehow our children ever see the day in which it is announced that we do not have these weapons any more, and that we can no longer destroy ourselves and that we’ve got to do something else to do with our time than they will have the right to throw up their arms, let down their streamers and let forth a resounding cheer.

Jerome Corsi photo

„An atomic Iran is imminent … mullahs may have bomb by June.“

—  Jerome Corsi American conservative author 1946

Title of article, WorldNetDaily (2005-04-01) http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43590

L. Ron Hubbard photo
Martin Luther King, Jr. photo

„War is not the answer. Communism will never be defeated by the use of atomic bombs or nuclear weapons.“

—  Martin Luther King, Jr. American clergyman, activist, and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement 1929 - 1968

1960s, Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence (1967)
Contesto: War is not the answer. Communism will never be defeated by the use of atomic bombs or nuclear weapons. Let us not join those who shout war and, through their misguided passions, urge the United States to relinquish its participation in the United Nations. These are days which demand wise restraint and calm reasonableness. We must not engage in a negative anticommunism, but rather in a positive thrust for democracy, realizing that our greatest defense against communism is to take offensive action in behalf of justice. We must with positive action seek to remove those conditions of poverty, insecurity, and injustice, which are the fertile soil in which the seed of communism grows and develops.

Tuli Kupferberg photo
Lewis Pugh photo
Phyllis Schlafly photo

„The atomic bomb is a marvelous gift that was given to our country by a wise God.“

—  Phyllis Schlafly American activist 1924 - 2016

Quoted in Women are the Best Warmakers, Raymond Coffey, The Day, New London, Connecticut, 1982-07-08 http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=6RIhAAAAIBAJ&sjid=P3UFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5075,1148166&dq=the-atomic-bomb-is-a-marvelous-gift&hl=en,

Halldór Laxness photo
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien photo

„The news today about "Atomic bombs" is so horrifying one is stunned.“

—  John Ronald Reuel Tolkien British philologist and author, creator of classic fantasy works 1892 - 1973

No. 102: From a letter to his son Christopher Tolkien (9 August, 1945)
Contesto: The news today about "Atomic bombs" is so horrifying one is stunned. The utter folly of these lunatic physicists to consent to do such work for war-purposes: calmly plotting the destruction of the world! Such explosives in men's hands, while their moral and intellectual status is declining, is about as useful as giving out firearms to all inmates of a gaol and then saying that you hope "this will ensure peace". But one good thing may arise out of it, I suppose, if the write-ups are not overheated: Japan ought to cave in. Well we're in God's hands. But He does not look kindly on Babel-builders.

Harry Truman photo

„The world will note that the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, a military base.“

—  Harry Truman American politician, 33rd president of the United States (in office from 1945 to 1953) 1884 - 1972

Report on the Potsdam Conference (1945)
Contesto: The world will note that the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, a military base. That was because we wished in this first attack to avoid, insofar as possible, the killing of civilians. But that attack is only a warning of things to come. If Japan does not surrender, bombs will have to be dropped on her war industries and, unfortunately, thousands of civilian lives will be lost. I urge Japanese civilians to leave industrial cities immediately, and save themselves from destruction.

„Christians should urge our government to destroy all its atomic bombs“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957

What Does God Want Us to Do About Russia? (1948)
Contesto: We Christians should urge our government to destroy all its atomic bombs, stop making any additional ones, and stop all preparations to wage war with biological weapons. Such actions would... place our government in an advantageous position to plead with all other nations to join with us in an international treaty of disarmament by as rapid stages as possible.

Bertrand Russell photo

„Suppose atomic bombs had reduced the population of the world to one brother and one sister, should they let the human race die out?“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Origine: 1950s, Human Society in Ethics and Politics (1954), p. 47
Contesto: Suppose atomic bombs had reduced the population of the world to one brother and one sister, should they let the human race die out? I do not know the answer, but I do not think it can be in the affirmative merely on the ground that incest is wicked.

Leó Szilárd photo

„Suppose Germany had developed two bombs before we had any bombs. And suppose Germany had dropped one bomb, say, on Rochester and the other on Buffalo, and then having run out of bombs she would have lost the war. Can anyone doubt that we would then have defined the dropping of atomic bombs on cities as a war crime, and that we would have sentenced the Germans who were guilty of this crime to death at Nuremberg and hanged them?“

—  Leó Szilárd Physicist and biologist 1898 - 1964

"President Truman Did Not Understand" http://www.peak.org/~danneng/decision/usnews.html in U.S. News & World Report (15 August 1960)
Variant: If the Germans had dropped atomic bombs on cities instead of us, we would have defined the dropping of atomic bombs on cities as a war crime, and we would have sentenced the Germans who were guilty of this crime to death at Nuremberg and hanged them.
As quoted in The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb (1996) by Dennis Wainstock, p. 122
Contesto: Suppose Germany had developed two bombs before we had any bombs. And suppose Germany had dropped one bomb, say, on Rochester and the other on Buffalo, and then having run out of bombs she would have lost the war. Can anyone doubt that we would then have defined the dropping of atomic bombs on cities as a war crime, and that we would have sentenced the Germans who were guilty of this crime to death at Nuremberg and hanged them?
But, again, don't misunderstand me. The only conclusion we can draw is that governments acting in a crisis are guided by questions of expediency, and moral considerations are given very little weight, and that America is no different from any other nation in this respect.

Yousef Saanei photo

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