„Fear is always in relation to something; it does not exist by itself.“

There is fear of what happened yesterday in relation to the possibility of its repetition tomorrow; there is always a fixed point from which relationship takes place. How does fear come into this? I had pain yesterday; there is the memory of it and I do not want it again tomorrow. Thinking about the pain of yesterday, thinking which involves the memory of yesterday’s pain, projects the fear of having pain again tomorrow. So it is thought that brings about fear. Thought breeds fear; thought also cultivates pleasure. To understand fear you must also understand pleasure — they are interrelated; without understanding one you cannot understand the other. This means that one cannot say ‘I must only have pleasure and no fear’; fear is the other side of the coin which is called pleasure. Thinking with the images of yesterday’s pleasure, thought imagines that you may not have that pleasure tomorrow; so thought engenders fear. Thought tries to sustain pleasure and thereby nourishes fear. Thought has separated itself as the analyzer and the thing to be analyzed; they are both parts of thought playing tricks upon itself. In doing all this it is refusing to examine the unconscious fears; it brings in time as a means of escaping fear and yet at the same time sustains fear.
Beyond Violence (1973), p. 66, ISBN 0-06-064839-2
1970s

Estratto da Wikiquote. Ultimo aggiornamento 03 Giugno 2021. Storia
Jiddu Krishnamurti photo
Jiddu Krishnamurti11
filosofo apolide 1895 - 1986

Citazioni simili

Michel Foucault photo
Huey P. Newton photo
John Frusciante photo

„Worship itself is a given — or it does not exist at all.“

—  Josef Pieper German philosopher 1904 - 1997

Origine: Leisure, the Basis of Culture (1948), Leisure, the Basis of Culture, p. 59

Yukio Mishima photo

„There isn't any fear in existence itself, or any uncertainty, but living creates it.“

—  Yukio Mishima, libro Il sapore della gloria

Origine: The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea

Margaret Mitchell photo
John Connolly photo
Elias Canetti photo

„The once-seen does not exist yet. The always seen no longer exists.“

—  Elias Canetti Bulgarian-born Swiss and British jewish modernist novelist, playwright, memoirist, and non-fiction writer 1905 - 1994

J. Agee, trans. (1989), p. 64
Das Geheimherz der Uhr [The Secret Heart of the Clock] (1987)

Sören Kierkegaard photo
Jane Roberts photo
Vincent Van Gogh photo

„Such a one does not always know what he can do, but he nevertheless instinctively feels, I am good for something! My existence is not without reason!“

—  Vincent Van Gogh Dutch post-Impressionist painter (1853-1890) 1853 - 1890

1880s, 1880, Letter to Theo (Cuesmes, July 1880)
Contesto: There is a great difference between one idler and another idler. There is someone who is an idler out of laziness and lack of character, owing to the baseness of his nature. If you like, you may take me for one of those. Then there is the other kind of idler, the idler despite himself, who is inwardly consumed by a great longing for action who does nothing because his hands are tied, because he is, so to speak, imprisoned somewhere, because he lacks what he needs to be productive, because disastrous circumstances have brought him forcibly to this end. Such a one does not always know what he can do, but he nevertheless instinctively feels, I am good for something! My existence is not without reason! I know that I could be a quite a different person! How can I be of use, how can I be of service? There is something inside me, but what can it be? He is quite another idler. If you like you may take me for one of those.

Russell L. Ackoff photo
John Berger photo
Philip K. Dick photo

„Fear can make you do more wrong than hate or jealousy… fear makes you always, always hold something back.“

—  Philip K. Dick, libro Valis

Origine: Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said (1974), Chapter 21 (p. 171)
Origine: VALIS
Contesto: "Fear,” Jason said, “can make you do more wrong than hate or jealousy. If you're afraid you don’t commit yourself to life completely; fear makes you always, always hold something back.”'

Nikos Kazantzakis photo
Jiddu Krishnamurti photo

„Does choice exist when I see something very clearly?“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986

2nd Question & Answer Meeting, Brockwood Park, UK (11 September 1971)
1970s

John Updike photo
Bertrand Russell photo
James K. Morrow photo
Jiddu Krishnamurti photo

„You know, in the case of most of us, the mind is noisy, everlastingly chattering to itself , soliloquizing or chattering about something, or trying to talk to itself, to convince itself of something; it is always moving, noisy.“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986

Varanasi 2nd Public Talk (22 November 1964)
1960s
Contesto: You know, in the case of most of us, the mind is noisy, everlastingly chattering to itself, soliloquizing or chattering about something, or trying to talk to itself, to convince itself of something; it is always moving, noisy. And from that noise, we act. Any action born of noise produces more noise, more confusion. But if you have observed and learnt what it means to communicate, the difficulty of communication, the non-verbalization of the mind — that is, that communicates and receives communication—, then, as life is a movement, you will, in your action, move on naturally, freely, easily, without any effort, to that state of communion. And in that state of communion, if you enquire more deeply, you will find that you are not only in communion with nature, with the world, with everything about you, but also in communion with yourself.

Argomenti correlati