„Aryabhatiya, an improved work, is product of mature intellect, which he wrote when he was 23 years old. Unlike in the Aryabhata siddhanta, the civil days are reckoned from one sunrise to the next, a practice which is still prevalent among the followers of Hindu calendar.“

—  Aryabhata

In, p. 244.
Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures

Ultimo aggiornamento 22 Maggio 2020. Storia
Aryabhata photo
Aryabhata
matematico, astronomo e astrologo indiano 476 - 550

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