Frasi di Grace Murray Hopper

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Grace Murray Hopper

Data di nascita: 9. Dicembre 1906
Data di morte: 1. Gennaio 1992

Grace Murray Hopper è stata una matematica, informatica e ammiraglio statunitense.

Frasi Grace Murray Hopper

„Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, "We've always done it this way." I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.“

—  Grace Hopper

Unsourced variant: The most dangerous phrase in the language is, "We've always done it this way."
The Wit and Wisdom of Grace Hopper (1987)

„If they put you down somewhere with nothing to do, go to sleep — you don't know when you'll get any more.“

—  Grace Hopper

Grace Hopper on Late Night with David Letterman (2 October 1986) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-vcErOPofQ
Contesto: There's something you learn in your first boot-camp, or training camp: If they put you down somewhere with nothing to do, go to sleep — you don't know when you'll get any more.

„We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data.“

—  Grace Hopper

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contesto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

„We must state relationships, not procedures.“

—  Grace Hopper

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contesto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

„Please cut off a nanosecond and send it over to me.“

—  Grace Hopper

On demonstrating a billionth of a second of electricity travel with a piece of wire, in an interview on 60 Minutes (24 August 1986)
Contesto: In total desperation, I called over to the engineering building, and I said, "Please cut off a nanosecond and send it over to me."

„A human must turn information into intelligence or knowledge. We've tended to forget that no computer will ever ask a new question.“

—  Grace Hopper

The Wit and Wisdom of Grace Hopper (1987)
Contesto: We're flooding people with information. We need to feed it through a processor. A human must turn information into intelligence or knowledge. We've tended to forget that no computer will ever ask a new question.

„The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets.“

—  Grace Hopper

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contesto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

„You manage things, you lead people. We went overboard on management and forgot about leadership.“

—  Grace Hopper

The Wit and Wisdom of Grace Hopper (1987)
Contesto: You manage things, you lead people. We went overboard on management and forgot about leadership. It might help if we ran the MBAs out of Washington.

„These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform.“

—  Grace Hopper

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contesto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

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„A ship in port is safe; but that is not what ships are built for. Sail out to sea and do new things.“

—  Grace Hopper

This saying appears to be due to John Augustus Shedd; it was quoted in "Grace Hopper : The Youthful Teacher of Us All" by Henry S. Tropp in Abacus Vol. 2, Issue 1 (Fall 1984) ISSN 0724-6722 . She did repeat this saying on multiple occasions, but she called it "a motto that has stuck with me" and did not claim coinage. Additional variations and citations may be found at Quote Investigator http://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/12/09/safe-harbor/
Misattributed

„At the end of about a week, I called back and said, "I need something to compare this to. Could I please have a microsecond?"“

—  Grace Hopper

On demonstrating a millionth of a second of electricity travel with a piece of wire, in an interview on 60 Minutes (24 August 1986)

„To me programming is more than an important practical art. It is also a gigantic undertaking in the foundations of knowledge.“

—  Grace Hopper

David Sayre, while in a panel discussion with Hopper, as quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 277
Misattributed

„From then on, when anything went wrong with a computer, we said it had bugs in it.“

—  Grace Hopper

On the removal of a 2-inch-long moth from the Harvard Mark II experimental computer at Harvard in 1947, as quoted in Time (16 April 1984). Note that the term "bug" was in use by people in several technical disciplines long before that; Thomas Edison used the term, and it was common AT&T parlance in the 1920s to refer to bugs in the wires. Hopper is credited with popularizing the term's use in the computing field.

„The wonderful thing about standards is that there are so many of them to choose from.“

—  Grace Hopper

Attributed to Hopper, without source, in The UNIX-HATERS Handbook http://web.mit.edu/~simsong/www/ugh.pdf (1994), edited by Simson Garfinkel, Daniel Weise, and Steven Strassmann ISBN 1-56884-203-1, p. 9, this is most commonly attributed to Andrew Tanenbaum, as it appears in his book Computer Networks (1981), p. 168, but has also been attributed to Patricia Seybold and Ken Olsen.
Disputed

„[The Computer] was the first machine man built that assisted the power of his brain instead of the strength of his arm.“

—  Grace Hopper

As spoken at Space Coast 1987 speaking about the Harvard Mark I computer. The Computer was originally She in reference to the Mark I.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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