Frasi di James Branch Cabell

James Branch Cabell foto
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James Branch Cabell

Data di nascita: 14. Aprile 1879
Data di morte: 5. Maggio 1958

Pubblicità

James Branch Cabell è stato uno scrittore statunitense.

Cresciuto tra le memorie eroiche del vecchio Sud, sfuggì al provincialismo della società virginiana del suo tempo viaggiando a lungo in Europa. In un mitico medioevo europeo, in un territo­rio al confine tra la fantasia e la realtà storica, am­bientò i diciotto raffinati romanzi che compongono la saga di Dom Manuel e dei suoi discendenti. Particolare for­tuna, tra essi, ebbero Jurgen e Lo stallone d'ar­gento .

Cabell era tenuto in gran considerazione dai suoi contemporanei, tra cui H. L. Mencken, Edmund Wilson e Sinclair Lewis. Le sue opere si adattano bene nella cultura degli anni venti, periodo in cui sono state molto popolari. L'interesse per Cabell diminuì negli anni trenta:, questo calo è stato attribuito in parte alla sua incapacità di staccarsi e uscire dal suo mondo di fantasia. Alfred Kazin disse: "Cabell e Hitler non abitano lo stesso universo". Pur essendo opere di evasione, gli scritti di Cabell sono ironici e satirici. Egli vedeva l'arte come una via di fuga dalla vita, ma una volta che l'artista ha creato il suo mondo ideale si accorge che è composto dagli stessi elementi di quello reale.

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Frasi James Branch Cabell

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

— James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

Pubblicità

„I have modeled and remodeled, and cannot get exactly to my liking. So it is necessary that I keep laboring at it, until the figure is to my thinking and my desire.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: The stranger pointed at the unfinished, unsatisfying image which stood beside the pool of Haranton, wherein, they say, strange dreams engender.... "What is that thing?" the stranger was asking, yet again... "It is the figure of a man," said Manuel, "which I have modeled and remodeled, and cannot get exactly to my liking. So it is necessary that I keep laboring at it, until the figure is to my thinking and my desire." Ch. XL : Colophon: Da Capo

„It is necessary that I climb very high because of my love for you, and upon the heights there is silence.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: It spurred me to such action as I took, — but it has robbed me of sugared eloquence, it has left me chary of speech. It is necessary that I climb very high because of my love for you, and upon the heights there is silence. "Auctorial Induction"

„The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it, and it does not greatly matter after all whether a book be an epic or a directory. What really matters is that there is so much faith and love and kindliness which we can share with and provoke in others, and that by cleanly, simple, generous living we approach perfection in the highest and most lovely of all arts.... But you, I think, have always comprehended this. "Auctorial Induction"

„I agree with Freydis that, for various reasons, nobody ever, quite, knew Manuel well.
The hero of "The Silver Stallion" is, thus, no person, but an idea“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I agree with Freydis that, for various reasons, nobody ever, quite, knew Manuel well. The hero of "The Silver Stallion" is, thus, no person, but an idea, — an idea presented at the moment of its conception... I mean, of course, the idea that Manuel, who was yesterday the physical Redeemer of Poictesme, will by and by return as his people's spiritual Redeemer. Author's Note

„Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names?
He is only a scribbler who is content.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: Thus he labors, and loudly they jeer at him; — That is, when they remember he still exists. Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names? He is only a scribbler who is content. "Auctorial Induction"

„All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

Pubblicità

„The little silver effigies which his postulants fashion and adore are well enough: but Kalki is a horse of another color.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: Is it not a pity, Guivric, that this Kalki will not come in our day, and that we shall never behold his complete glory? I cry a lament for that Kalki who will someday bring back to their appointed places high faith and very ardent loves and hatreds; and who will see to it that human passions are in never so poor a way to find expressions in adequate speech and action. Ohé, I cry a loud lament for Kalki! The little silver effigies which his postulants fashion and adore are well enough: but Kalki is a horse of another color. Horvendille, in Book Six : In the Sylan's House, Ch. XXXIX : One Warden Left Uncircumvented

„I seem to see only the strivings of an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who has reeled blunderingly from mystery to mystery“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I seem to see only the strivings of an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who has reeled blunderingly from mystery to mystery, with pathetic makeshifts, not understanding anything, greedy in all desires, and always honeycombed with poltroonery. So in a secret place his youth was put away in exchange for a prize that was hardly worth the having; and the fine geas which his mother laid upon him was exchanged for the common geas of what seems expected. Manuel, in Ch. XXXIX : The Passing of Manuel

„If we assiduously cultivate our powers of exaggeration, perhaps we, too, shall obtain the Paradise of Liars.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: If we assiduously cultivate our powers of exaggeration, perhaps we, too, shall obtain the Paradise of Liars. And there Raphael shall paint for us scores and scores of his manifestly impossible pictures … and Shakespeare will lie to us of fabulous islands far past 'the still-vex'd Bermoothes,' and bring us fresh tales from the coast of Bohemia. For no one will speak the truth there, and we shall all be perfectly happy. "On Telling the Truth" in William and Mary College Monthly (November 1897), VII, p. 53-55

„You must permit that I begin it in my own way, with what may to you at first seem dream-stuff.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: You must permit that I begin it in my own way, with what may to you at first seem dream-stuff. For I commence at Storisende, in the world's youth, when the fourth Count Emmerick reigned in Poictesme, having not yet blundered into the disfavor of his papal cousin Adrian VII.... With such roundabout gambits alone can some of us approach — as one fancy begets another, if you will — to proud assurance that life is not blind and aimless business; not all a hopeless waste and confusion; and that we ourselves may (by and by) be strong and excellent and wise. "Richard Fentnor Harroby" in Ch. 1 : Pallation of the Gambit

Pubblicità

„I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy. But as it is, my worshipers depart from me heartedly, in this grey corridor, and they are devoid of fear and parvanimity; for the effect of my singing, like that of all great singing, is to fill my hearers with a sentiment of their importance as moral beings and the greatness of their destinies. The Gander, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLV : The Gander Also Generalizes

„People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so. And in consequence, their love-affairs, their maxims, their so-called natural ties and instincts, and above all, their wickedness, became just so many bungling plagiarisms from something they had read, in a novel or a Bible or a poem or a newspaper. People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different. Human life was a distorting tarnished mirror held up to literature: this much at least of Wilde's old paradox — that life mimicked art — was indisputable. Human life, very clumsily, tried to reproduce the printed word. Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„Love that is God-born, bides as God eternal, And changes not; —“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: Sad hours and glad hours, and all hours, pass over; One thing unshaken stays: Life, that hath Death for spouse, hath Chance for lover; Whereby decays Each thing save one thing: — mid this strife diurnal Of hourly change begot, Love that is God-born, bides as God eternal, And changes not; — Nor means a tinseled dream pursuing lovers Find altered by-and-bye, When, with possession, time anon discovers Trapped dreams must die, — For he that visions God, of mankind gathers One manlike trait alone, And reverently imputes to Him a father's Love for his son. "To Robert Gamble Cabell II: In Dedication of The Certain Hour"

„I am not so wonderful but that in the hour of my triumph I am frightened by my own littleness.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I am not so wonderful but that in the hour of my triumph I am frightened by my own littleness. Look you, Niafer, I had thought I would be changed when I had become a famous champion, but for all that I stand posturing here with this long sword, and am master of the hour and of the future, I remain the boy that last Thursday was tending pigs. Miramon, in Ch. IV : In the Doubtful Palace

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