Frasi di James Branch Cabell

James Branch Cabell foto
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James Branch Cabell

Data di nascita: 14. Aprile 1879
Data di morte: 5. Maggio 1958

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James Branch Cabell è stato uno scrittore statunitense.

Cresciuto tra le memorie eroiche del vecchio Sud, sfuggì al provincialismo della società virginiana del suo tempo viaggiando a lungo in Europa. In un mitico medioevo europeo, in un territo­rio al confine tra la fantasia e la realtà storica, am­bientò i diciotto raffinati romanzi che compongono la saga di Dom Manuel e dei suoi discendenti. Particolare for­tuna, tra essi, ebbero Jurgen e Lo stallone d'ar­gento .

Cabell era tenuto in gran considerazione dai suoi contemporanei, tra cui H. L. Mencken, Edmund Wilson e Sinclair Lewis. Le sue opere si adattano bene nella cultura degli anni venti, periodo in cui sono state molto popolari. L'interesse per Cabell diminuì negli anni trenta:, questo calo è stato attribuito in parte alla sua incapacità di staccarsi e uscire dal suo mondo di fantasia. Alfred Kazin disse: "Cabell e Hitler non abitano lo stesso universo". Pur essendo opere di evasione, gli scritti di Cabell sono ironici e satirici. Egli vedeva l'arte come una via di fuga dalla vita, ma una volta che l'artista ha creato il suo mondo ideale si accorge che è composto dagli stessi elementi di quello reale.

Frasi James Branch Cabell

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

— James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

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„This is a strong magic.This is a sententious magic.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: This is a strong magic. This is a sententious magic. They had warned me that I would here face my own destruction, that I would here face the most pitiable and terrible of all things: and I face here that which I have made of life, and life of me. I shudder; I am conscious of every appropriate sentiment. Nevertheless, sir, I must venture the suggestion that mere, explicit allegory as a form of art is somewhat obsolete. Guivric, in Book Six : In the Sylan's House, Ch. XL : Economics of Glaum-Without-Bones

„To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

„It is true I have not told you everything. Why should I? No Author ever does....“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: It is true I have not told you everything. Why should I? No Author ever does.... With Felix Kennaston — or, if you prefer it so, with Horvendile, — rests safe this secret and peculiar knowledge as to how the life of Manuel may yet repair to it's first home after some seven centuries of exile. Thus will the traveller return — by and by — to the place of his starting; the legend of the second coming of the Redeemer will be justified, in, at all events, my lesser world; and the tale to Manuel's life will have come again, as it did once beside the pool of Haranton, full circle. The Epilogue : Which is the proper ending of all comedies; and heralds, it may be, an afterpiece.

„I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours. And some of us, I think, once in a while get a peep through these windows. But we are not permitted to get a long peep, or an unobstructed peep, nor very certainly, are we permitted to see all there is — out yonder. The fatal fault, sir, of your theorizing is that it is too complete. It aims to throw light upon the universe, and therefore is self-evidently moonshine. The Wardens of Earth do not desire that we should understand the universe, Mr. Kennaston; it is part of Their appointed task to insure that we never do; and because of Their efficiency every notion that any man, dead, living, or unborn, might form as to the universe will necessarily prove wrong. Ch 28 : The Shallowest Sort of Mysticism

„The insect looked at Jurgen, and its pincers rose erect in horror.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: The insect looked at Jurgen, and its pincers rose erect in horror. The bug cried to the three judges, — Now, by St. Anthony! this Jurgen must forthwith be relegated to limbo, for he is offensive and lewd and lascivious and indecent.… — And how can that be?… says Jurgen. — You are offensive,… the bug replied, — because this page has a sword which I chose to say is not a sword. You are lewd because that page has a lance which I prefer to think is not a lance. You are lascivious because yonder page has a staff which I elect to declare is not a staff. And finally, you are indecent for reasons of which a description would be objectionable to me, and which therefore I must decline to reveal to anybody.…

„It is necessary that I climb very high because of my love for you, and upon the heights there is silence.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: It spurred me to such action as I took, — but it has robbed me of sugared eloquence, it has left me chary of speech. It is necessary that I climb very high because of my love for you, and upon the heights there is silence. "Auctorial Induction"

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„I judge not, but am judged: and a man whose life has gone out of him, my pigs, is not even good bacon.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I shall not ever return to you, my pigs, because, at worst, to die valorously is better than to sleep out one's youth in the sun. A man has but one life. It is his all. Therefore I now depart from you, my pigs, to win me a fine wife and much wealth and leisure wherein to discharge my geas. And when my geas is lifted I shall not come back to you, my pigs, but I shall travel everywhither, and into the last limits of earth, so that I may see the ends of this world and may judge them while my life endures. For after that, they say, I judge not, but am judged: and a man whose life has gone out of him, my pigs, is not even good bacon. Manuel, in Ch. I : How Manuel Left the Mire

„I shall never of my own free will expose the naked soul of Manuel to anybody.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I shall never of my own free will expose the naked soul of Manuel to anybody. No, it would be no pleasant spectacle, I think: certainly, I have never looked at it, nor did I mean to. Perhaps, as you assert, some power which is stronger than I may some day tear all masks aside: but this will not be my fault, and I shall even then reserve the right to consider that stripping as a rather vulgar bit of tyranny. Manuel, in Ch. XXXIX : The Passing of Manuel

„I shall not ever return to you, my pigs, because, at worst, to die valorously is better than to sleep out one's youth in the sun. A man has but one life. It is his all.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I shall not ever return to you, my pigs, because, at worst, to die valorously is better than to sleep out one's youth in the sun. A man has but one life. It is his all. Therefore I now depart from you, my pigs, to win me a fine wife and much wealth and leisure wherein to discharge my geas. And when my geas is lifted I shall not come back to you, my pigs, but I shall travel everywhither, and into the last limits of earth, so that I may see the ends of this world and may judge them while my life endures. For after that, they say, I judge not, but am judged: and a man whose life has gone out of him, my pigs, is not even good bacon. Manuel, in Ch. I : How Manuel Left the Mire

„Each in his day, and within howsoever limited a circle of adherents, awakened that sustaining faith which appears vitally necessary to men's contentment, in the legend of the all powerful Redeemer who will come again, to-morrow.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: Each in his day, and within howsoever limited a circle of adherents, awakened that sustaining faith which appears vitally necessary to men's contentment, in the legend of the all powerful Redeemer who will come again, to-morrow. The theme of this book, then, is how that legend came to attach itself to Dom Manuel; how, in particular, that legend afterward affected, or did not affect, those persons who had known Dom Manuel almost intimately; and how in the end nobody believed in it any longer except Donander Veratyr. But Donander Veratyr was God. Author's Note

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„The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.... at the bottom of his heart, he was still expecting the transfiguring touch to come, some day, from something he was to obtain or do, perhaps to-morrow.... Then he had by accident found out the sigil's power... Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„A book, once it is printed and published, becomes individual.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: A book, once it is printed and published, becomes individual. It is by its publication as decisively severed from its author as in parturition a child is cut off from its parent. The book "means" thereafter, perforce, — both grammatically and actually, — whatever meaning this or that reader gets out of it. "A Note on Cabellian Harmonics" in Cabellian Harmonics (April 1928)

„I have been telling you, from alpha to omega, what is the one great thing the sigil taught me — that everything in life is miraculous.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: I have been telling you, from alpha to omega, what is the one great thing the sigil taught me — that everything in life is miraculous. For the sigil taught me that it rests within the power of each of us to awaken at will from a dragging nightmare of life made up of unimportant tasks and tedious useless little habits, to see life as it really is, and to rejoice in its exquisite wonderfulness. If the sigil were proved to be the top of a tomato-can, it would not alter that big fact, nor my fixed faith. No Harrowby, the common names we call things by do not matter — except to show how very dull we are... The Epilogue : Which is the proper ending of all comedies; and heralds, it may be, an afterpiece.

„All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion.“

— James Branch Cabell
Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

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