Frasi di Arthur Wellesley Wellington

Arthur Wellesley Wellington foto
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Arthur Wellesley Wellington

Data di nascita: 1. Maggio 1769
Data di morte: 14. Settembre 1852
Altri nomi:Arthur Wellesley, I duca di Wellington,Duca di Wellington

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Sir Arthur Wellesley, I duca di Wellington , è stato un generale e politico britannico di origine irlandese.

Dopo aver iniziato la carriera militare combattendo in India, comandò le forze anglo-portoghesi durante la guerra d'indipendenza spagnola, espellendo, dopo una serie estenuante di campagne dal 1809 al 1813, l'esercito francese dalla Spagna e raggiungendo la Francia meridionale.

Vittorioso e salutato come un eroe in patria, prese parte, come rappresentante del suo paese al Congresso di Vienna. Dopo il ritorno di Napoleone Bonaparte dall'isola d'Elba, assunse il comando delle forze anglo-alleate schierate in Belgio e vinse, insieme all'esercito prussiano del feldmaresciallo Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, la battaglia di Waterloo che determinò la sconfitta definitiva dell'imperatore francese.

Wellington fu anche per due volte primo ministro del Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda.

Generale avveduto, metodico e riflessivo, alieno da slanci offensivi ma prudente e sagace nella manovra, il duca di Wellington adottò abili tattiche di battaglia sfruttando le capacità difensive delle sue truppe, e nella penisola iberica ottenne una serie di brillanti vittorie contro i luogotenenti di Napoleone, nonostante le grandi difficoltà organizzative e la limitatezza dei suoi mezzi. Nella campagna del 1815 in Belgio fu sorpreso dalla rapidità delle manovre iniziali di Napoleone e dovette combattere una drammatica battaglia difensiva a Waterloo; la sua solidità di spirito e il coraggio dei suoi soldati gli permisero di resistere fino all'intervento decisivo dell'esercito prussiano.

Il suo nome è associato a un tipo di stivale e a un bombardiere inglese della seconda guerra mondiale.

Frasi Arthur Wellesley Wellington

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„It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there. Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."

„The history of a battle, is not unlike the history of a ball. Some individuals may recollect all the little events of which the great result is the battle won or lost, but no individual can recollect the order in which, or the exact moment at which, they occurred, which makes all the difference as to their value or importance.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: The history of a battle, is not unlike the history of a ball. Some individuals may recollect all the little events of which the great result is the battle won or lost, but no individual can recollect the order in which, or the exact moment at which, they occurred, which makes all the difference as to their value or importance... Letter to John Croker (8 August 1815), as quoted in The History of England from the Accession of James II (1848) by Thomas Babington Macaulay, [http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/hst/european/TheHistoryofEnglandfromtheAccessionofJamesIIVol1/chap5.html Volume I Chapter 5], p. 180.; and in The Waterloo Letters (1891) edited by H. T. Sibome

„Napoleon has humbugged me, by God“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: Napoleon has humbugged me, by God; he has gained twenty-four hours' march on me. At the Duchess of Richmond's ball (15 June 1815), as quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/9460 Camps, Quarters, and Casual Places] (1896) by Archibald Forbes, quotes Captain Bowles account and citing the Letters of the First Earl of Malmesbury.

„Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: My heart is broken by the terrible loss I have sustained in my old friends and companions and my poor soldiers. Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public. Letter from the field of Waterloo (June 1815), as quoted in Decisive Battles of the World (1899) by Edward Shepherd Creasy. Quoted too in Memorable Battles in English History: Where Fought, why Fought, and Their Results; with the Military Lives of the Commanders by William Henry Davenport Adams; Editor Griffith and Farran, 1863. p. 400.

„It has been a damned serious business“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there. Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."

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„I never saw so many shocking bad hats in my life.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
When asked what he thought of the first Reformed Parliament, as quoted in Words on Wellington (1889) by Sir William Fraser, p. 12.

„Mistaken for me, is he? That's strange, for no one ever mistakes me for Mr. Jones.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
In response to being told that the painter George Jones bore a strong resemblance to him, and that he was often mistaken for him, as quoted in My Autobiography and Reminiscences Vol. 1 (1887).

„[I don't] care a twopenny damn what [becomes] of the ashes of Napoleon Bonaparte.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
As quoted in The Times [London] (9 October 1944); this attribution probably originates in a letter by Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay (6 March 1849), in which he states "How they settle the matter I care not, as the duke says, one twopenny damn."

„I have no small talk and Peel has no manners.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
As quoted in Collections and Recollections (1898) by G. W. E. Russell, ch.14.

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„During the Peninsula War, I heard a Portuguese general address his troops before a battle with the words, "Remember men, you are Portuguese!"“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Wellington's reply when asked, late in his life, what was the most inane remark he had ever heard, as quoted in Journals of Alec Guinness (February 1998) by Alec Guinness

„If you believe that you will believe anything.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
In reply to a man who greeted him in the street with the words "Mr. Jones, I believe?", as quoted in Wellington — The Years of the Sword (1969) by Elizabeth Longford.

„The French system of conscription brings together a fair sample of all classes; ours is composed of the scum of the earth — the mere scum of the earth. It is only wonderful that we should be able to make so much out of them afterwards.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Speaking about soldiers in the British Army, 4 November 1813 A French army is composed very differently from ours. The conscription calls out a share of every class — no matter whether your son or my son — all must march; but our friends — I may say it in this room — are the very scum of the earth. People talk of their enlisting from their fine military feeling — all stuff — no such thing. Some of our men enlist from having got bastard children — some for minor offences — many more for drink; but you can hardly conceive such a set brought together, and it really is wonderful that we should have made them the fine fellows they are. Notes for 11 November 1831.

„We always have been, we are, and I hope that we always shall be, detested in France.“

— Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
As quoted in Wellington and His Friends (1965) by Gerald Wellesley, 7th Duke of Wellington, p. 138, and in [http://www.economist.com/printedition/displayStory.cfm?story_id=4079435 The Economist (16 June 2005)]

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