Frasi di Thomas Henry Huxley

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Thomas Henry Huxley

Data di nascita: 4. Maggio 1825
Data di morte: 29. Giugno 1895
Altri nomi: Thomas Huxley

Pubblicità

Thomas Henry Huxley è stato un biologo e filosofo britannico.

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Frasi Thomas Henry Huxley

„[L'origine delle specie di Charles Darwin è] lo strumento più potente che gli uomini hanno sottomano, dopo la pubblicazione dei Principia di Newton, per ampliare il campo della conoscenza naturale.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
Source: Citato in James Dewey Watson, In principio fu il Verbo o il Dna? http://www.corriere.it/Primo_Piano/Documento/2005/09_Settembre/28/index.shtml, Corriere della Sera, 2 gennaio 2006.

Pubblicità

„E così, qualsiasi sistema di organi si sia studiato, quando si comparino le loro modificazioni nella serie delle scimmie, si arriva ad una sola conclusione: che le differenze strutturali che separano l'uomo dal gorilla e dallo scimpanzé non sono così grandi come quelle che separano il gorilla dalle scimmie inferiori.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
Source: Thus, whatever system of organs be studied, the comparison of their modifications in the ape series leads to one and the same result—that the structural differences which separate Man from the Gorilla and the Chimpanzee are not so great as those which separate the Gorilla from the lower apes. (da Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature, cap. 2, § 123 https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Evidence_as_to_Man%27s_Place_in_Nature/Chapter_2#123)

„Ai fini di una vera cultura, un'educazione esclusivamente scientifica ha quanto meno lo stesso valore di un'educazione esclusivamente letteraria.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
Source: Da Science and Education, p. 141; citato in William Boyd, Storia dell'educazione occidentale (The History of western education), a cura di Trieste Valdi, Armando Editore, Roma, 1966.

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„The antagonism between science and religion, about which we hear so much, appears to me to be purely factitious“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1880s, fabricated, on the one hand, by short-sighted religious people who confound a certain branch of science, theology, with religion; and, on the other, by equally short-sighted scientific people who forget that science takes for its province only that which is susceptible of clear intellectual comprehension; and that, outside the boundaries of that province, they must be content with imagination, with hope, and with ignorance. "The interpreters of Genesis and the interpreters of Nature" (1885) http://aleph0.clarku.edu/huxley/CE4/GeNat.html

„The life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1860s, A Liberal Education and Where to Find It (1868), Context: The life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It is a game which has been played for untold ages, every man and woman of us being one of the two players in a game of his or her own. The chessboard is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just, and patient. But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. To the man who plays well, the highest stakes are paid, with that sort of overflowing generosity with which the strong shows delight in strength. And one who plays ill is checkmated — without haste, but without remorse.

„Agnosticism is not properly described as a "negative" creed, nor indeed as a creed of any kind, except in so far as it expresses absolute faith in the validity of a principle which is as much ethical as intellectual. This principle may be stated in various ways, but they all amount to this: that it is wrong for a man to say that he is certain of the objective truth of any proposition unless he can produce evidence which logically justifies that certainty.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1880s, Agnosticism (1889), Context: Agnosticism is not properly described as a "negative" creed, nor indeed as a creed of any kind, except in so far as it expresses absolute faith in the validity of a principle which is as much ethical as intellectual. This principle may be stated in various ways, but they all amount to this: that it is wrong for a man to say that he is certain of the objective truth of any proposition unless he can produce evidence which logically justifies that certainty. This is what agnosticism asserts; and, in my opinion, it is all that is essential to agnosticism. That which agnostics deny and repudiate as immoral is the contrary doctrine, that there are propositions which men ought to believe, without logically satisfactory evidence; and that reprobation ought to attach to the profession of disbelief in such inadequately supported propositions. The justification of the agnostic principle lies in the success which follows upon its application, whether in the field of natural or in that of civil history; and in the fact that, so far as these topics are concerned, no sane man thinks of denying its validity.

„Size is not grandeur, and territory does not make a nation.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1870s, Context: I cannot say that I am in the slightest degree impressed by your bigness, or your material resources, as such. Size is not grandeur, and territory does not make a nation. The great issue, about which hangs true sublimity, and the terror of overhanging fate, is what are you going to do with all these things? "Address on University Education" (1876) http://aleph0.clarku.edu/huxley/CE3/Ad-U-Ed.html, delivered at the formal opening of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, September 12, 1876. Huxley, American Addresses (1877), p. 125. Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey used the same words in a commencement address at the Holton-Arms School, Bethesda, Maryland, June 1967; reported in The Washington Post (June 11, 1967), p. K3

„But orthodoxy is the Bourbon of the world of thought.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1860s, Context: It is true that if philosophers have suffered their cause has been amply avenged. Extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every science as the strangled snakes beside that of Hercules; and history records that whenever science and orthodoxy have been fairly opposed, the latter has been forced to retire from the lists, bleeding and crushed if not annihilated; scotched, if not slain. But orthodoxy is the Bourbon of the world of thought. It learns not, neither can it forget; and though, at present, bewildered and afraid to move, it is as willing as ever to insist that the first chapter of Genesis contains the beginning and the end of sound science... Darwiniana: the Origin of Species (1860) http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext04/8thdr10.txt

„Extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every science as the strangled snakes beside that of Hercules“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley
1860s, Context: It is true that if philosophers have suffered their cause has been amply avenged. Extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every science as the strangled snakes beside that of Hercules; and history records that whenever science and orthodoxy have been fairly opposed, the latter has been forced to retire from the lists, bleeding and crushed if not annihilated; scotched, if not slain. But orthodoxy is the Bourbon of the world of thought. It learns not, neither can it forget; and though, at present, bewildered and afraid to move, it is as willing as ever to insist that the first chapter of Genesis contains the beginning and the end of sound science... Darwiniana: the Origin of Species (1860) http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext04/8thdr10.txt

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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