Frasi di Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul

Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul foto
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Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul

Data di nascita: 17. Agosto 1932
Altri nomi:विद्याधर सुरजप्रसाद नेपाल

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Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, noto anche come V. S. Naipaul , è uno scrittore trinidadiano, naturalizzato britannico. Tra i maggiori scrittori viventi, nasce a Chaguanas, un piccolo villaggio dell'isola caraibica di Trinidad nel 1932 da genitori indiani di casta braminica. Suo nonno, originario dell'India nord-orientale, era emigrato a Trinidad nel secolo precedente per lavorare nelle piantagioni di canna da zucchero. Suo padre Seepersad era giornalista del Trinidad Guardian e autore di novelle. V. S. Naipaul si trasferisce in Inghilterra nel 1950 dove frequenta l'università di Oxford. Inizia a collaborare saltuariamente a diversi giornali e pubblica i suoi primi romanzi nel 1954.

La sua vita è segnata dai numerosi viaggi che compie: inizia a viaggiare nel 1960. Nel 1990 la Regina Elisabetta gli assegna il titolo di Knight Bachelor , tre anni dopo, nel 1993 è il primo beneficiario del premio David Cohen British Literature Prize, nel 1999 ha ricevuto il Premio Grinzane Cavour. Riceve il Premio Nobel per la letteratura nel 2001 con la seguente motivazione: "per aver unito una descrizione percettiva ad un esame accurato incorruttibile costringendoci a vedere la presenza di storie soppresse".

Frasi Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul

„Senza la scrittura, ogni cosa diventerà insipida. Leggere non avrebbe più senso, perché uno scrittore legge con uno scopo.“

— Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul
citato in [https://web. archive. org/web/20160101000000/http://archiviostorico. corriere. it/2004/dicembre/06/NAIPAUL_Una_fuga_senza_fine_co_9_041206052. shtml Un fuga senza fine, Corriere della sera], 6 dicembre 2004

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„Odiare l'oppressione, ma temere gli oppressi.“

— Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul
citato in [https://web. archive. org/web/20160101000000/http://archiviostorico. corriere. it/2004/dicembre/06/NAIPAUL_Una_fuga_senza_fine_co_9_041206052. shtml Un fuga senza fine, Corriere della sera], 6 dicembre 2004

„The universal civilization has been a long time in the making. It wasn't always universal; it wasn't always as attractive as it is today.“

— V.S. Naipaul
Context: The universal civilization has been a long time in the making. It wasn't always universal; it wasn't always as attractive as it is today. The expansion of Europe gave it for at least three centuries a racial taint, which still causes pain. … This idea of the pursuit of happiness is at the heart of the attractiveness of the civilization to so many outside it or on its periphery. I find it marvelous to contemplate to what an extent, after two centuries, and after the terrible history of the earlier part of this century, the idea has come to a kind of fruition. It is an elastic idea; it fits all men. It implies a certain kind of society, a certain kind of awakened spirit. I don't imagine my father's Hindu parents would have been able to understand the idea. So much is contained in it: the idea of the individual, responsibility, choice, the life of the intellect, the idea of vocation and perfectibility and achievement. It is an immense human idea. It cannot be reduced to a fixed system. It cannot generate fanaticism. But it is known to exist, and because of that, other more rigid systems in the end blow away. [https://www.nytimes.com/1990/11/05/opinion/our-universal-civilization.html "Our Universal Civilization" in The New York Times (5 November 1990)]

„Nehru was unique in recent world history: a colonial protest figure, a folk hero who did not appeal to fanaticism but was a reasonable, reasoning man. A man committed to science, religious tolerance, the rule of law and the rights of man.“

— V.S. Naipaul
Context: India has been very lucky in the Nehru family. Nehru was unique in recent world history: a colonial protest figure, a folk hero who did not appeal to fanaticism but was a reasonable, reasoning man. A man committed to science, religious tolerance, the rule of law and the rights of man. Indira Gandhi, his daughter, carried on this way of looking at things. In Britain, she might have had the reputation of being domineering, harsh, even ruthless. And you can easily make a case for her being authoritarian, antidemocratic, stamping out protest. But it isn't enough just to do that. One must consider what was on the other side. In 1975, some opposition parties wanted India to go back to some pre-industrial time of village life. Piety can take odd forms. [https://www.nytimes.com/1984/11/03/opinion/india-after-indira-gandhi.html "India After Indira Gandhi" in The Daily Mail, and The New York Times (3 November 1984)]

„Men need history; it helps them to have an idea of who they are.“

— V.S. Naipaul
Context: Men need history; it helps them to have an idea of who they are. But history, like sanctity, can reside in the heart; it is enough that there is something there. "The Ceremony of Farewell"

„That element of surprise is what I look for when I am writing.“

— V.S. Naipaul
Context: I have told people who ask for lectures that I have no lecture to give. And that is true. It might seem strange that a man who has dealt in words and emotions and ideas for nearly fifty years shouldn't have a few to spare, so to speak. But everything of value about me is in my books. Whatever extra there is in me at any given moment isn't fully formed. I am hardly aware of it; it awaits the next book. It will — with luck — come to me during the actual writing, and it will take me by surprise. That element of surprise is what I look for when I am writing. [http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2001/naipaul-lecture-e.html "Two Worlds," Nobel lecture (7 December 2001)]

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„It is an immense human idea. It cannot be reduced to a fixed system. It cannot generate fanaticism. But it is known to exist, and because of that, other more rigid systems in the end blow away.“

— V.S. Naipaul
Context: The universal civilization has been a long time in the making. It wasn't always universal; it wasn't always as attractive as it is today. The expansion of Europe gave it for at least three centuries a racial taint, which still causes pain. … This idea of the pursuit of happiness is at the heart of the attractiveness of the civilization to so many outside it or on its periphery. I find it marvelous to contemplate to what an extent, after two centuries, and after the terrible history of the earlier part of this century, the idea has come to a kind of fruition. It is an elastic idea; it fits all men. It implies a certain kind of society, a certain kind of awakened spirit. I don't imagine my father's Hindu parents would have been able to understand the idea. So much is contained in it: the idea of the individual, responsibility, choice, the life of the intellect, the idea of vocation and perfectibility and achievement. It is an immense human idea. It cannot be reduced to a fixed system. It cannot generate fanaticism. But it is known to exist, and because of that, other more rigid systems in the end blow away. [https://www.nytimes.com/1990/11/05/opinion/our-universal-civilization.html "Our Universal Civilization" in The New York Times (5 November 1990)]

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