Frasi di Booker T. Washington

Booker T. Washington foto
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Booker T. Washington

Data di nascita: 5. Aprile 1856
Data di morte: 14. Novembre 1915

Pubblicità

Booker Taliaferro Washington è stato un educatore, scrittore e oratore statunitense, punto di riferimento per la comunità afroamericana dell'epoca.

Affrancato dalla schiavitù quando era ancora un bambino, dopo aver svolto diversi umili lavori nella Virginia Occidentale riuscì a riscattarsi grazie alla buona istruzione conseguita presso la Hampton University e il Seminario Weyland. Su raccomandazione del fondatore della Hampton Samuel C. Armstrong, ancora in giovane età diventò il primo direttore del nuovo Tuskegee Institute, che allora era una scuola per diventare insegnanti riservata agli afroamericani.

Washington credeva che l'istruzione avesse un ruolo cruciale perché i cittadini afroamericani potessero risalire nella scala sociale e nelle strutture economiche degli Stati Uniti. Diventò celebre a livello nazionale come portavoce e leader della comunità nera. Nonostante il suo approccio non-conflittuale fosse criticato da alcuni altri leader afroamericani , riuscì a stringere buoni rapporti con grandi filantropi come Anna T. Jeanes, Henry Huddleston Rogers , Julius Rosenwald e la Famiglia Rockefeller, che finanziarono con milioni di dollari la Hampton e il Tuskagee Institute e contribuirono a pagare gli studi a centinaia di bambini neri del sud degli Stati Uniti, oltre a donare fondi per sostenere cause legali contro la segregazione razziale e la revoca del diritto di voto.

Washington ricevette lauree honoris causa dal Dartmouth College e dall'Università Harvard e fu il primo nero ad essere ospitato dal presidente degli Stati Uniti alla Casa Bianca. Dal 1895 al giorno della sua morte fu considerato l'afroamericano più potente della nazione; numerose scuole e edifici pubblici in tutto il paese sono stati battezzati con il suo nome.

Frasi Booker T. Washington

Pubblicità

„Character, not circumstances, makes the man.“

— Booker T. Washington
[http://web.archive.org/20071031084046/www.historycooperative.org/btw/Vol.4/html/222.html "Democracy and Education"], speech, Institute of Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn NY (30 September 1896)

„Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company.“

— Booker T. Washington
"Associate yourself with Men of good Quality if you Esteem your own Reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad Company." This was a French maxim, late 16th century, as quoted by George Washington in his "Rules of Civility and Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation," Rule # 56 (ca. 1744) [http://gwpapers.virginia.edu/documents/civility/transcript.html]

„You can't hold a man down without staying down with him.“

— Booker T. Washington
As quoted in The Great Quotations (1971) edited by George Seldes, p. 641

Pubblicità

„I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.“

— Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
Context: I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed. Looked at from this standpoint, I almost reached the conclusion that often the Negro boy's birth and connection with an unpopular race is an advantage, so far as real life is concerned. With few exceptions, the Negro youth must work harder and must perform his tasks even better than a white youth in order to secure recognition. But out of the hard and unusual struggle through which he is compelled to pass, he gets a strength, a confidence, that one misses whose pathway is comparatively smooth by reason of birth and race. Chapter II: Boyhood Days

„Men may make laws to hinder and fetter the ballot, but men cannot make laws that will bind or retard the growth of manhood.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: Men may make laws to hinder and fetter the ballot, but men cannot make laws that will bind or retard the growth of manhood. We went into slavery a piece of property; we came out American citizens. We went into slavery pagans; we came out Christians. We went into slavery without a language; we came out speaking the proud Anglo-Saxon tongue. We went into slavery with slave chains clanking about our wrists; we came out with the American ballot in our hands. Progress, progress is the law of nature; under God it shall be our eternal guiding star. [http://web.archive.org/20071031084051/www.historycooperative.org/btw/Vol.4/html/93.html "The Problems of the Colored Race in the South," lecture, Hamilton Club, Chicago (10 December 1895)]

„Progress, progress is the law of nature; under God it shall be our eternal guiding star.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: Men may make laws to hinder and fetter the ballot, but men cannot make laws that will bind or retard the growth of manhood. We went into slavery a piece of property; we came out American citizens. We went into slavery pagans; we came out Christians. We went into slavery without a language; we came out speaking the proud Anglo-Saxon tongue. We went into slavery with slave chains clanking about our wrists; we came out with the American ballot in our hands. Progress, progress is the law of nature; under God it shall be our eternal guiding star. [http://web.archive.org/20071031084051/www.historycooperative.org/btw/Vol.4/html/93.html "The Problems of the Colored Race in the South," lecture, Hamilton Club, Chicago (10 December 1895)]

„Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color. One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him. [http://web.archive.org/20050322051431/www.historycooperative.org/btw/Vol.10/html/35.html An Address on Abraham Lincoln before the Republican Club of New York City (12 February 1909)]

Pubblicità

„Providence so often uses men and institutions to accomplish a purpose.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: I pity from the bottom of my heart any nation or body of people that is so unfortunate as to get entangled in the net of slavery. I have long since ceased to cherish any spirit of bitterness against the Southern white people on account of the enslavement of my race. No one section of our country was wholly responsible for its introduction, and, besides, it was recognized and protected for years by the General Government. Having once got its tentacles fastened on to the economic and social life of the Republic, it was no easy matter for the country to relieve itself of the institution. Then, when we rid ourselves of prejudice, or racial feeling, and look facts in the face, we must acknowledge that, notwithstanding the cruelty and moral wrong of slavery, the ten million Negroes inhabiting this country, who themselves or whose ancestors went through the school of American slavery, are in a stronger and more hopeful condition, materially, intellectually, morally, and religiously, than is true of an equal number of black people in any other portion of the globe. This is so to such an extend that Negroes in this country, who themselves or whose forefathers went through the school of slavery, are constantly returning to Africa as missionaries to enlighten those who remained in the fatherland. This I say, not to justify slavery — on the other hand, I condemn it as an institution, as we all know that in America it was established for selfish and financial reasons, and not from a missionary motive — but to call attention to a fact, and to show how Providence so often uses men and institutions to accomplish a purpose. Chapter I: A Slave Among Slaves

„The home life of the English seems to me to be about as perfect as anything can be. Everything moves like clockwork.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: In one thing, at least, I feel sure that the English are ahead of Americans, and that is, they have learned how to get more out of life. The home life of the English seems to me to be about as perfect as anything can be. Everything moves like clockwork. I was impressed, too, with the deference that the servants show to their "masters" and "mistresses" - terms which I suppose would not be tolerated in America. The English servant expects, as a rule, to be nothing but a servant, and so he perfects himself in the art to a degree that no class of servants in America has yet reached. In our country the servant expects to become, in a few years, a "master" himself. Which system is preferable? I will not venture an answer. Chapter XVI: Europe

„The English servant expects, as a rule, to be nothing but a servant, and so he perfects himself in the art to a degree that no class of servants in America has yet reached. In our country the servant expects to become, in a few years, a "master" himself.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: In one thing, at least, I feel sure that the English are ahead of Americans, and that is, they have learned how to get more out of life. The home life of the English seems to me to be about as perfect as anything can be. Everything moves like clockwork. I was impressed, too, with the deference that the servants show to their "masters" and "mistresses" - terms which I suppose would not be tolerated in America. The English servant expects, as a rule, to be nothing but a servant, and so he perfects himself in the art to a degree that no class of servants in America has yet reached. In our country the servant expects to become, in a few years, a "master" himself. Which system is preferable? I will not venture an answer. Chapter XVI: Europe

„My whole life has largely been one of surprises.“

— Booker T. Washington
Context: My whole life has largely been one of surprises. I believe that any man's life will be filled with constant, unexpected encouragements of this kind if he makes up his mind to do his level best each day of his life — that is, tries to make each day reach as nearly as possible the high-water mark of pure, unselfish, useful living. Chapter XVII: Last Words

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