Frasi di Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Marco Vitruvio Pollione foto
5  1

Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Data di nascita: 80 a.C.
Data di morte: 15 a.C.

Pubblicità

Marco Vitruvio Pollione è stato un architetto e scrittore romano, attivo nella seconda metà del I secolo a.C., considerato il più famoso teorico dell'architettura di tutti i tempi.

Frasi Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Pubblicità

„As for Mars, when that divinity is enshrined outside the walls, the citizens will never take up arms against each other, and he will defend the city from its enemies and save it from danger in war.“

—  Vitruvius
Context: For the temples, the sites for those of the gods under whose particular protection the state is thought to rest and for Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, should be on the very highest point commanding a view of the greater part of the city. Mercury should be in the forum, or, like Isis and Serapis, in the emporium; Apollo and Father Bacchus near the theater; Hercules at the circus in communities which have no gymnasia nor amphitheatres; Mars outside the city but at the training ground, and so Venus, but at the harbor. It is moreover shown by the Etruscan diviners in treatises on their science that the fanes of Venus, Vulcan, and Mars should be situated outside the walls, in order that the young men and married women may not become habituated in the city to the temptations incident to the worship of Venus, and that buildings may be free from the terror of fires through the religious rites and sacrifices which call the power of Vulcan beyond the walls. As for Mars, when that divinity is enshrined outside the walls, the citizens will never take up arms against each other, and he will defend the city from its enemies and save it from danger in war. Chapter VII, Sec. 1

„If there are no sandpits from which it can be dug, then we must sift it out from river beds or from gravel or even from the sea beach. This kind however has these defects when used in masonry“

—  Vitruvius
Context: If there are no sandpits from which it can be dug, then we must sift it out from river beds or from gravel or even from the sea beach. This kind however has these defects when used in masonry: it dries slowly... and such a wall cannot carry vaultings. Furthermore, when sea-sand is used in walls and these are coated with stucco, a salty efflorescence is given out which spoils the surface. Chapter IV, Sec. 2

„All... must be built with due reference to durability, convenience, and beauty. Durability will be assured when foundations are carried down to the solid ground and materials wisely and liberally selected; convenience, when the arrangement of the apartments is faultless and presents no hindrance to use, and“

—  Vitruvius
Context: All... must be built with due reference to durability, convenience, and beauty. Durability will be assured when foundations are carried down to the solid ground and materials wisely and liberally selected; convenience, when the arrangement of the apartments is faultless and presents no hindrance to use, and when each class of building is assigned to its suitable and appropriate exposure; and beauty, when the appearance of the work is pleasing and in good taste, and when its members are in due proportion according to correct principles of symmetry. Chapter III, Sec. 2

Pubblicità

„Let the directions of your streets and alleys be laid down on the lines of division between the quarters of two winds. On this principle of arrangement the disagreeable force of the winds will be shut out from dwellings and lines of houses.“

—  Vitruvius
Context: Let the directions of your streets and alleys be laid down on the lines of division between the quarters of two winds. On this principle of arrangement the disagreeable force of the winds will be shut out from dwellings and lines of houses. For if the streets run full in the face of the winds, their constant blasts rushing in from the open country, and then confined by narrow alleys, will sweep through them with great violence. The lines of houses must therefore be directed away from the quarters from which the winds blow, so that as they come in they may strike against the angles of the blocks and their force thus be broken and dispersed. Chapter VI, Sec. 7-8

„At Halicarnassus, the house of that most potent king Mausolus“

—  Vitruvius
Context: At Halicarnassus, the house of that most potent king Mausolus, though decorated throughout with Proconnesian marble, has walls built of brick which are to this day of extraordinary strength, and are covered with stucco so highly polished that they seem to be as glistening as glass. That king did not use brick from poverty; for he was choke-full of revenues, being ruler of all Caria. Chapter VIII, Sec. 10

„As for men upon whom nature has bestowed so much ingenuity, acuteness, and memory“

—  Vitruvius
Context: As for men upon whom nature has bestowed so much ingenuity, acuteness, and memory that they are able to have a thorough knowledge of geometry, astronomy, music, and the other arts, they go beyond the functions of architects and become pure mathematicians. Hence they can readily take up positions against those arts because many are the artistic weapons with which they are armed. Such men, however, are rarely found, but there have been such at times; for example, Aristarchus of Samos, Philolaus, and Archytas of Tarentum, Apollonius of Perga, Eratosthenes of Cyrene, and among Syracusans Archimedes and Scopinas, who through mathematics and natural philosophy discovered, expounded, and left to posterity many things in connection with mechanics and with sundials. Chapter I, Sec. 16

„The hornbeam... is not a wood that breaks easily and is very convenient to handle.“

—  Vitruvius
Context: The hornbeam... is not a wood that breaks easily and is very convenient to handle. Hence the Greeks call it "zygia," because they make of it yokes for their draught animals... Cypress and pine are also just as admirable; for although they... are apt to warp when used in buildings... they can be kept to a great age without rotting because the liquid contained within their substances has a bitter taste which by its pungency prevents the entrance of decay or of those little creatures which are destructive. Hence buildings made of these kinds of wood last for an unending period of time. Chapter IX, Sec. 12

Pubblicità

„Let down a lighted lamp, and if it keeps burning, a man may make the descent without danger.“

—  Vitruvius
Context: To guard against this, we must proceed as follows. Let down a lighted lamp, and if it keeps burning, a man may make the descent without danger. Chapter VI, Sec. 13

„After slaking it, mix your mortar“

—  Vitruvius
Context: With regard to lime we must be careful that it is burned from a stone which, whether soft or hard, is in any case white. Lime made of close-grained stone of the harder sort will be good in structural parts; lime of porous stone, in stucco. After slaking it, mix your mortar, if using pitsand, in the proportions of three parts of sand to one of lime; if using river or sea-sand, mix two parts of sand with one of lime. These will be the right proportions for the composition of the mixture. Further, in using river or sea-sand, the addition of a third part composed of burnt brick, pounded up and sifted, will make your mortar of a better composition to use. Chapter V "Lime" Sec. 1

„With the ripening of the fruits in Autumn“

—  Vitruvius
Context: With the ripening of the fruits in Autumn the leaves begin to wither and the trees, taking up their sap from the earth through the roots, recover themselves and are restored to their former solid texture. But the strong air of winter compresses and solidifies them. Chapter IX, Sec. 2

„Let the stone be taken from the quarry two years before“

—  Vitruvius
Context: Since, on account of the proximity of the stone-quarries... nearest to the city, necessity drives us to make use of their products, we must proceed as follows if we wish our work to be finished without flaws. Let the stone be taken from the quarry two years before building is to begin, and not in winter, but in summer. Then let it lie exposed in an open place. Such stone as been damaged by the two years of exposure should be used in the foundations. The rest, which remains unhurt, has passed the test of nature and will endure in those parts of the building which are above ground. This precaution should be observed, not only with dimension stone, but also with the rubble which is to be used in walls. Chapter VII, Sec. 5

Avanti
Anniversari di oggi
Giulia Carcasi71
scrittrice italiana 1984
Alfonso Varano foto
Alfonso Varano5
poeta e drammaturgo italiano 1705 - 1788
Samuel Johnson foto
Samuel Johnson15
critico letterario, poeta e saggista britannico 1709 - 1784
Christian Friedrich Hebbel foto
Christian Friedrich Hebbel11
poeta e drammaturgo tedesco 1813 - 1863
Altri 49 anniversari oggi
Autori simili
 Ibico foto
Ibico4
poeta greco antico
Adolf Loos foto
Adolf Loos15
architetto austriaco
Enzo Biagi foto
Enzo Biagi200
giornalista, scrittore e conduttore televisivo italiano
Francesco Milizia foto
Francesco Milizia3
teorico dell'architettura, storico dell'arte e critico d...
Michail Bulgakov foto
Michail Bulgakov55
scrittore e drammaturgo russo
Gustaw Herling-Grudziński foto
Gustaw Herling-Grudziński22
scrittore polacco