Frasi di Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Marco Vitruvio Pollione photo
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Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Data di nascita: 80 a.C.
Data di morte: 15 a.C.

Marco Vitruvio Pollione è stato un architetto e scrittore romano, attivo nella seconda metà del I secolo a.C., considerato il più famoso teorico dell'architettura di tutti i tempi.

Lavori

De architectura
Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Frasi Marco Vitruvio Pollione

„La scienza dell'architetto si adorna di molte discipline e di svariata erudizione: egli deve essere in grado di giudicare tutte quelle opere che le singole arti costruiscono.“

—  Marco Vitruvio Pollione

Origine: Da Architettura, I,1,1, traduzione di S. Ferri, Palombi, Roma, 1960. Citato in Bruno Gentili, Luciano Stupazzini, Manlio Simonetti, Antologia della letteratura latina, Editori Laterza, Roma-Bari, 1989, p. 499.

„Oak… lasts for an unlimited period when buried in underground structures.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

...when exposed to moisture... it cannot take in liquid on account of its compactness, but, withdrawing from the moisture, it resists it and warps, thus making cracks.
Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX, Sec. 8

„For the eye is always in search of beauty,“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book III, Chapter III, Sec. 13
Contesto: For the eye is always in search of beauty, and if we do not gratify its desire for pleasure by a proportionate enlargement in these measures, and thus make compensation for ocular deception, a clumsy and awkward appearance will be presented to the beholder.

„This is also the case with women“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX "Timber" Sec. 1
Contesto: In Spring all trees become pregnant, and they are all employing their natural vigor in the production of leaves and of the fruits that return every year. The requirements of that season render them empty and swollen, and so they are weak and feeble because of their looseness of texture. This is also the case with women who have conceived. Their bodies are not considered perfectly healthy until the child is born.

„This is because there is a very small proportion of the elements of fire and air in its composition“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX, Sec. 14
Contesto: The larch... is not only preserved from decay and the worm by the great bitterness of its sap, but also it cannot be kindled with fire nor ignite of itself, unless like stone in a limekiln it is burned with other wood.... This is because there is a very small proportion of the elements of fire and air in its composition, which is a dense and solid mass of moisture and the earthy, so that it has no open pores through which fire can find its way... Further, its weight will not let it float in water.

„Lay a second foundation enough inside the first“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book I, Chapter V, Sec. 7
Contesto: Lay a second foundation enough inside the first... Having laid these two foundations... build cross walls between them uniting the outer and inner foundation in a comb like arrangement set like teeth of a saw. With this form of construction the burden of earth will be distributed into small bodies and will not lie with all its weight in one crushing mass so as to thrust out substructures.

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„Travertine and all stone of that class can stand injury“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter VII, Sec. 2
Contesto: Travertine and all stone of that class can stand injury whether from a heavy load laid upon it or from the weather; exposure to fire, however, it cannot bear, but splits and cracks to pieces at once. This is because in its natural composition there is but little moisture and not much of the earthy, but a great deal of air and of fire. Therefore, it is not only without the earthy and watery elements, but when fire, expelling the air from it by the operation and force of heat, penetrates into its inmost parts and occupies the empty spaces of the fissures there comes a great glow and the stone is made to burn as fiercely as do the particles of fire itself.

„The properties of the soil are as different and unlike as are the various countries.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter VI, Sec. 5
Contesto: There will still be the question why Tuscany, although it abounds in hot springs, does not furnish a powder out of which, on the same principle, a wall can be made which will set fast under water.... The properties of the soil are as different and unlike as are the various countries.... Hence it is not in all the places where boiling springs of hot water abound that there is the same combination of favourable circumstances... For things are produced in accordance with the will of nature; not to suit man's pleasure, but as it were by a chance distribution.

„Hence buildings made of these kinds of wood last for an unending period of time.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX, Sec. 12
Contesto: The hornbeam... is not a wood that breaks easily and is very convenient to handle. Hence the Greeks call it "zygia," because they make of it yokes for their draught animals... Cypress and pine are also just as admirable; for although they... are apt to warp when used in buildings... they can be kept to a great age without rotting because the liquid contained within their substances has a bitter taste which by its pungency prevents the entrance of decay or of those little creatures which are destructive. Hence buildings made of these kinds of wood last for an unending period of time.

„But if the moisture is sucked out of the mortar by the porous rubble, and the lime and sand separate and disunite“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter VIII, Sec. 2
Contesto: Both kinds should be constructed of the smallest stones, so that the walls, being thoroughly puddled with the mortar, which is made of lime and sand, may hold together longer. If the stones used are soft and porous, they are apt to suck the moisture out of the mortar and so to dry it up. But when there is abundance of lime and sand, the wall, containing more moisture, will not soon lose its strength, for they will hold it together. But if the moisture is sucked out of the mortar by the porous rubble, and the lime and sand separate and disunite, the rubble can no longer adhere to them and the wall will in time become a ruin.

„Bricks… should not be made of sandy or pebbly clay, or of fine gravel“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter III "Brick" Sec. 1
Contesto: Bricks... should not be made of sandy or pebbly clay, or of fine gravel, because when made of these kinds they are in the first place heavy; and secondly when washed by the rain as they stand in walls, they go to pieces and break up, and the straw in them does not hold together on account of the roughness of the material. They should rather be made of white and chalky or of red clay, or even of a coarse grained gravelly clay. These materials are smooth and therefore durable; they are not heavy to work with, and are readily laid.

„With the ripening of the fruits in Autumn“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX, Sec. 2
Contesto: With the ripening of the fruits in Autumn the leaves begin to wither and the trees, taking up their sap from the earth through the roots, recover themselves and are restored to their former solid texture. But the strong air of winter compresses and solidifies them.

„The hornbeam… is not a wood that breaks easily and is very convenient to handle.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter IX, Sec. 12
Contesto: The hornbeam... is not a wood that breaks easily and is very convenient to handle. Hence the Greeks call it "zygia," because they make of it yokes for their draught animals... Cypress and pine are also just as admirable; for although they... are apt to warp when used in buildings... they can be kept to a great age without rotting because the liquid contained within their substances has a bitter taste which by its pungency prevents the entrance of decay or of those little creatures which are destructive. Hence buildings made of these kinds of wood last for an unending period of time.

„As for "wattle and daub" I could wish that it had never been invented.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book II, Chapter VIII, Sec. 20
Contesto: As for "wattle and daub" I could wish that it had never been invented. The more it saves in time and gains in space, the greater and the more general is the disaster that it may cause; for it is made to catch fire, like torches. It seems better, therefore, to spend on walls of burnt brick, and be at expense, than to save with "wattle and daub," and be in danger. And, in the stucco covering, too, it makes cracks from the inside by the arrangement of its studs and girts. For these swell with moisture as they are daubed, and then contract as they dry, and by their shrinking cause the solid stucco to split. But since some are obliged to use it either to save time or money, or for partitions on an unsupported span, the proper method of construction is as follows. Give it a high foundation so that it may nowhere come in contact with the broken stone-work composing the floor...

„As for Mars, when that divinity is enshrined outside the walls, the citizens will never take up arms against each other, and he will defend the city from its enemies and save it from danger in war.“

—  Vitruvius, libro De architectura

Origine: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book I, Chapter VII, Sec. 1
Contesto: For the temples, the sites for those of the gods under whose particular protection the state is thought to rest and for Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, should be on the very highest point commanding a view of the greater part of the city. Mercury should be in the forum, or, like Isis and Serapis, in the emporium; Apollo and Father Bacchus near the theater; Hercules at the circus in communities which have no gymnasia nor amphitheatres; Mars outside the city but at the training ground, and so Venus, but at the harbor. It is moreover shown by the Etruscan diviners in treatises on their science that the fanes of Venus, Vulcan, and Mars should be situated outside the walls, in order that the young men and married women may not become habituated in the city to the temptations incident to the worship of Venus, and that buildings may be free from the terror of fires through the religious rites and sacrifices which call the power of Vulcan beyond the walls. As for Mars, when that divinity is enshrined outside the walls, the citizens will never take up arms against each other, and he will defend the city from its enemies and save it from danger in war.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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