Frasi di Pierre de Fermat

Pierre de Fermat photo
2  0

Pierre de Fermat

Data di nascita: 17. Agosto 1601
Data di morte: 12. Gennaio 1665

Pubblicità

Pierre de Fermat è stato un matematico e magistrato francese.

Fu tra i principali matematici della prima metà del XVII secolo e dette importanti contributi allo sviluppo della matematica moderna:

con il suo metodo per la individuazione dei massimi e dei minimi delle funzioni precorse gli sviluppi del calcolo differenziale.

fece ricerche di grande importanza sulla futura teoria dei numeri, iniziate durante la preparazione di un'edizione della Arithmetica di Diofanto, su cui scrisse note ed osservazioni contenenti numerosi teoremi. Proprio in una di queste osservazioni "a margine" enunciò il cosiddetto ultimo teorema di Fermat , che è rimasto indimostrato per più di 300 anni, fino al lavoro di Andrew Wiles nel 1994.

scoprì, indipendentemente da Cartesio, i principi fondamentali della geometria analitica e, attraverso la corrispondenza con Blaise Pascal, fu uno dei fondatori della teoria della probabilità.

Autori simili

Évariste Galois photo
Évariste Galois3
matematico francese
Raymond Queneau21
scrittore, poeta e matematico francese
Jean Baptiste Le Rond d'Alembert photo
Jean Baptiste Le Rond d'Alembert4
enciclopedista, matematico e fisico francese
Henri Poincaré photo
Henri Poincaré12
matematico, fisico e filosofo francese
 Cartesio photo
Cartesio44
filosofo e matematico francese
James Jeans photo
James Jeans5
astronomo, matematico e fisico britannico
Nassim Nicholas Taleb photo
Nassim Nicholas Taleb37
filosofo, saggista e matematico libanese
Kurt Gödel photo
Kurt Gödel5
matematico, logico e filosofo austriaco

Frasi Pierre de Fermat

Pubblicità

„There is scarcely any one who states purely arithmetical questions, scarcely any who understands them. Is this not because arithmetic has been treated up to this time geometrically rather than arithmetically?“

— Pierre de Fermat
Context: There is scarcely any one who states purely arithmetical questions, scarcely any who understands them. Is this not because arithmetic has been treated up to this time geometrically rather than arithmetically? This certainly is indicated by many works ancient and modern. Diophantus himself also indicates this. But he has freed himself from geometry a little more than others have, in that he limits his analysis to rational numbers only; nevertheless the Zetcica of Vieta, in which the methods of Diophantus are extended to continuous magnitude and therefore to geometry, witness the insufficient separation of arithmetic from geometry. Now arithmetic has a special domain of its own, the theory of numbers. This was touched upon but only to a slight degree by Euclid in his Elements, and by those who followed him it has not been sufficiently extended, unless perchance it lies hid in those books of Diophantus which the ravages of time have destroyed. Arithmeticians have now to develop or restore it. To these, that I may lead the way, I propose this theorem to be proved or problem to be solved. If they succeed in discovering the proof or solution, they will acknowledge that questions of this kind are not inferior to the more celebrated ones from geometry either for depth or difficulty or method of proof: Given any number which is not a square, there also exists an infinite number of squares such that when multiplied into the given number and unity is added to the product, the result is a square. Letter to Frénicle (1657) Oeuvres de Fermat Vol.II as quoted by Edward Everett Whitford, The Pell Equation http://books.google.com/books?id=L6QKAAAAYAAJ (1912)

„I propose this theorem to be proved or problem to be solved. If they succeed in discovering the proof or solution, they will acknowledge that questions of this kind are not inferior to the more celebrated ones from geometry either for depth or difficulty or method of proof“

— Pierre de Fermat
Context: There is scarcely any one who states purely arithmetical questions, scarcely any who understands them. Is this not because arithmetic has been treated up to this time geometrically rather than arithmetically? This certainly is indicated by many works ancient and modern. Diophantus himself also indicates this. But he has freed himself from geometry a little more than others have, in that he limits his analysis to rational numbers only; nevertheless the Zetcica of Vieta, in which the methods of Diophantus are extended to continuous magnitude and therefore to geometry, witness the insufficient separation of arithmetic from geometry. Now arithmetic has a special domain of its own, the theory of numbers. This was touched upon but only to a slight degree by Euclid in his Elements, and by those who followed him it has not been sufficiently extended, unless perchance it lies hid in those books of Diophantus which the ravages of time have destroyed. Arithmeticians have now to develop or restore it. To these, that I may lead the way, I propose this theorem to be proved or problem to be solved. If they succeed in discovering the proof or solution, they will acknowledge that questions of this kind are not inferior to the more celebrated ones from geometry either for depth or difficulty or method of proof: Given any number which is not a square, there also exists an infinite number of squares such that when multiplied into the given number and unity is added to the product, the result is a square. Letter to Frénicle (1657) Oeuvres de Fermat Vol.II as quoted by Edward Everett Whitford, The Pell Equation http://books.google.com/books?id=L6QKAAAAYAAJ (1912)

„And this proposition is generally true for all progressions and for all prime numbers; the proof of which I would send to you, if I were not afraid to be too long.“

— Pierre de Fermat
Fermat (in a letter dated October 18, 1640 to his friend and confidant Frénicle de Bessy) commenting on his statement<!--Fermat's statement--> that p divides a<sup> p−1</sup> − 1 whenever p is prime and a is coprime to p (this is what is now known as Fermat's little theorem).

„The result of my work has been the most extraordinary, the most unforeseen, and the happiest, that ever was; for, after having performed all the equations, multiplications, antitheses, and other operations of my method, and having finally finished the problem, I have found that my principle gives exactly and precisely the same proportion for the s which Monsieur Descartes has established.“

— Pierre de Fermat
Epist. XLII, written at Toulouse (Jan. 1, 1662) and reprinted in Œvres de Fermat, ii, p. 457; i, pp. 170, 173, as quoted by , A History of the Theories of Aether and Electricity from the Age of Descartes to the Close of the Nineteenth Century (1910) p. 10. https://books.google.com/books?id=CGJDAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA10

„I have discovered a truly remarkable proof of this theorem which this margin is too small to contain.“

— Pierre de Fermat
Note written on the margins of his copy of Claude-Gaspar Bachet's translation of the famous Arithmetica of Diophantus, this was taken as an indication of what became known as Fermat's last theorem, a correct proof for which would be found only 357 years later; as quoted in Number Theory in Science and Communication (1997) by Manfred Robert Schroeder

Anniversari di oggi
Pino Daniele photo
Pino Daniele45
cantautore e musicista italiano 1955 - 2015
Philip Roth photo
Philip Roth82
scrittore statunitense 1933
Ibn Khaldun photo
Ibn Khaldun4
storico e filosofo del Nordafrica 1332 - 1406
Giuseppe Diana2
presbitero e scrittore italiano 1958 - 1994
Altri 81 anniversari oggi
Autori simili
Évariste Galois photo
Évariste Galois3
matematico francese
Raymond Queneau21
scrittore, poeta e matematico francese
Jean Baptiste Le Rond d'Alembert photo
Jean Baptiste Le Rond d'Alembert4
enciclopedista, matematico e fisico francese
Henri Poincaré photo
Henri Poincaré12
matematico, fisico e filosofo francese
 Cartesio photo
Cartesio44
filosofo e matematico francese