Frasi di Francisco Franco

Francisco Franco foto
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Francisco Franco

Data di nascita: 4. Dicembre 1892
Data di morte: 20. Novembre 1975

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Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde, solitamente abbreviato in Francisco Franco e conosciuto anche come il Generalísimo Franco o il Caudillo de España , è stato un generale, politico e dittatore spagnolo.

Fu l'instauratore, in Spagna, di un regime dittatoriale noto come falangismo, parzialmente ispirato al fascismo. Rimase al potere dalla vittoria nella guerra civile spagnola del 1939 fino alla sua morte nel 1975.

Frasi Francisco Franco

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„The former included General Franco and the Greek dictator Metaxas, men who feared mass politics and allied themselves with bastions of the established order such as the monarchy and the Church...the new radical Right, in contrast, rose to power in Italy and Germany through elections and the parliamentary process.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: The crucial difference was between the regimes of the old Right, who wanted to turn the clock back to a pre-democratic elitist era, and the new Right who seized and sustained power through the instruments of mass politics. The former included General Franco and the Greek dictator Metaxas, men who feared mass politics and allied themselves with bastions of the established order such as the monarchy and the Church... the new radical Right, in contrast, rose to power in Italy and Germany through elections and the parliamentary process. Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe's 20th Century (1998), p. 27

„Whether the British ruling class are wicked or merely stupid is one of the most difficult questions of our time, and at certain moments a very important question.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: The most baffling thing in the Spanish war was the behaviour of the great powers. The war was actually won for Franco by the Germans and Italians, whose motives were obvious enough. The motives of France and Britain are less easy to understand. In 1936 it was clear to everyone that if Britain would only help the Spanish Government, even to the extent of a few million pounds’ worth of arms, Franco would collapse and German strategy would be severely dislocated. By that time one did not need to be a clairvoyant to foresee that war between Britain and Germany was coming; one could even foretell within a year or two when it would come. Yet in the most mean, cowardly, hypocritical way the British ruling class did all they could to hand Spain over to Franco and the Nazis. Why? Because they were pro-Fascist, was the obvious answer. Undoubtedly they were, and yet when it came to the final showdown they chose to stand up to Germany. It is still very uncertain what plan they acted on in backing Franco, and they may have had no clear plan at all. Whether the British ruling class are wicked or merely stupid is one of the most difficult questions of our time, and at certain moments a very important question. George Orwell, in "Looking Back on the Spanish War" (1943)

„Barring a small, remote Caudillo Square and a Franco Street that may or may not be named after him, this is all that remains of the man who ruled Spain for 36 years.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: It is time to visit General Francisco Franco. A short taxi ride does it, and I am deposited at the foot of a giant, prancing stone horse bearing a triumphant-looking granite copy of the dictator. This, the only public statue of the "caudillo (leader) for God and the fatherland" left in Madrid, stands at the gates to the environment ministry. Here, spattered with red paint hurled by protesters and with a few bunches of wilting flowers left by his admirers, General Franco must remain. For the conservative-run city hall has decreed the generalísimo does not deserve to be knocked off his pedestal. Barring a small, remote Caudillo Square and a Franco Street that may or may not be named after him, this is all that remains of the man who ruled Spain for 36 years. Giles Tremlett, in "[http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2004/nov/27/spain.gilestremlett?INTCMP=SRCH The generalísimo remains on his pedestal]" in The Guardian (27 November 2004)

„We do not believe in government through the voting booth.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: We do not believe in government through the voting booth. The Spanish national will was never freely expressed through the ballot box. Spain has no foolish dreams. Statement during the civil war, cited in 1938 by [http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,915079,00.html TIME Magazine,], also cited in John A. Crittenden, Parties and elections in the United States, Prentice-Hall, 1982, (p.6).

„By that time one did not need to be a clairvoyant to foresee that war between Britain and Germany was coming; one could even foretell within a year or two when it would come.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: The most baffling thing in the Spanish war was the behaviour of the great powers. The war was actually won for Franco by the Germans and Italians, whose motives were obvious enough. The motives of France and Britain are less easy to understand. In 1936 it was clear to everyone that if Britain would only help the Spanish Government, even to the extent of a few million pounds’ worth of arms, Franco would collapse and German strategy would be severely dislocated. By that time one did not need to be a clairvoyant to foresee that war between Britain and Germany was coming; one could even foretell within a year or two when it would come. Yet in the most mean, cowardly, hypocritical way the British ruling class did all they could to hand Spain over to Franco and the Nazis. Why? Because they were pro-Fascist, was the obvious answer. Undoubtedly they were, and yet when it came to the final showdown they chose to stand up to Germany. It is still very uncertain what plan they acted on in backing Franco, and they may have had no clear plan at all. Whether the British ruling class are wicked or merely stupid is one of the most difficult questions of our time, and at certain moments a very important question. George Orwell, in "Looking Back on the Spanish War" (1943)

Pubblicità

„Franco's own ideology was deeply conservative but it was subordinated to the perputation of his own power.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: Franco's own ideology was deeply conservative but it was subordinated to the perputation of his own power. He maintained control by repeatedly shifting the balance of influence within the regime according to internal and external pressures, and he continued to command loyalty by allowing the self-enrichment of his elites through the institutions of the state. Sebastian Balfour, quoted in Spain: A History (2000), edited by Raymond Carr (p.265).

„The most baffling thing in the Spanish war was the behaviour of the great powers.“

— Francisco Franco
Context: The most baffling thing in the Spanish war was the behaviour of the great powers. The war was actually won for Franco by the Germans and Italians, whose motives were obvious enough. The motives of France and Britain are less easy to understand. In 1936 it was clear to everyone that if Britain would only help the Spanish Government, even to the extent of a few million pounds’ worth of arms, Franco would collapse and German strategy would be severely dislocated. By that time one did not need to be a clairvoyant to foresee that war between Britain and Germany was coming; one could even foretell within a year or two when it would come. Yet in the most mean, cowardly, hypocritical way the British ruling class did all they could to hand Spain over to Franco and the Nazis. Why? Because they were pro-Fascist, was the obvious answer. Undoubtedly they were, and yet when it came to the final showdown they chose to stand up to Germany. It is still very uncertain what plan they acted on in backing Franco, and they may have had no clear plan at all. Whether the British ruling class are wicked or merely stupid is one of the most difficult questions of our time, and at certain moments a very important question. George Orwell, in "Looking Back on the Spanish War" (1943)

„We strive to form a single national front against the Judeo-Masonic lodges, against Moscow and the Marxist societies.“

— Francisco Franco
Statement in El defensor de Córdoba (24 July 1936), as cited by Javier Navarrete in [http://mcedhou1.housings.nexica.net/MAS_ALLA/html/version_texto.asp?IDArt=29 Más Allá]

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„The whole secret of the campaigns unleashed against Spain can be explained in two words: Masonry and Communism... we have to extirpate these two evils from our land.“

— Francisco Franco
Writing under the alias Jakin Boor in the journal Arriba in an article, "Masonry and Communism" (14 December 1946), as quoted in Franco: A Biography by Juan Pablo Fusi Aizpurúạ, p. 71

„General Franco made it clear that Spain could enter the war only when England was about ready to collapse.“

— Francisco Franco
Admiral Wilhelm Canaris. Quoted in The Last European War (1976) by John Lukacs (p. 114).

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