Frasi di George Washington

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George Washington

Data di nascita: 22. Febbraio 1732
Data di morte: 14. Dicembre 1799

George Washington è stato un politico e generale statunitense.

Fu comandante in capo dell'Esercito continentale durante tutta la guerra d'indipendenza americana ed è divenuto in seguito il primo Presidente degli Stati Uniti d'America . È considerato uno dei grandi padri fondatori della nazione, e il suo volto è ritratto sul Monte Rushmore insieme a quello di Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson e Theodore Roosevelt. Ha anche ricoperto la carica di presidente della Convenzione per la Costituzione nel 1787.

Frasi George Washington

„Quando sono raffreddato so cosa mi occorre: una cipolla al forno da mangiare prima di andare a letto.“

—  George Washington

Attribuite
Origine: Citato in Jean Carper, Mangia bene e starai meglio, traduzione di Rossella Traldi, Sperling & Kupfer, Milano, 1995, p. 386. ISBN 88-200-1919-1

„Un esercito è chiamato a servire un Paese, non a governarlo.“

—  George Washington

Origine: Citato in Michele Scozzai, Le ombre di George W., Focus Storia n. 35, settembre 2009, p. 70.

Questa traduzione è in attesa di revisione. È corretto?

„La base del nostro sistema politico è il diritto della gente di fare e di cambiare la costituzione del loro governo.“

—  George Washington

Origine: Citato in Dizionario mondiale di Storia, Rizzoli Larousse, Milano, 2003, p. 1343. ISBN 88-525-0077-4

Questa traduzione è in attesa di revisione. È corretto?
Questa traduzione è in attesa di revisione. È corretto?

„It is better to be alone than in bad company.“

—  George Washington

Letter to his niece, Harriet Washington (30 October 1791)
1790s
Variante: It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.

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„The blessed Religion revealed in the word of God will remain an eternal and awful monument to prove that the best Institutions may be abused by human depravity; and that they may even, in some instances be made subservient to the vilest of purposes.“

—  George Washington

Origine: 1780s, p. 34 of a draft of a discarded and undelivered version of his first inaugural address (30 April 1789)
Contesto: The blessed Religion revealed in the word of God will remain an eternal and awful monument to prove that the best Institutions may be abused by human depravity; and that they may even, in some instances be made subservient to the vilest of purposes. Should, hereafter, those who are intrusted with the management of this government, incited by the lust of power & prompted by the supineness or venality of their Constituents, overleap the known barriers of this Constitution and violate the unalienable rights of humanity: it will only serve to shew, that no compact among men (however provident in its construction & sacred in its ratification) can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable—and if I may so express myself, that no wall of words—that no mound of parchmt can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.

„Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party, generally.“

—  George Washington

1790s, Farewell Address (1796)
Contesto: I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party, generally.

„I have the consolation to believe, that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.“

—  George Washington

1790s, Farewell Address (1796)
Contesto: Every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more, that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome. Satisfied, that, if any circumstances have given peculiar value to my services, they were temporary, I have the consolation to believe, that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.

„It is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness“

—  George Washington

1790s, Farewell Address (1796)
Contesto: It is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the Palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion, that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

„One of the expedients of party to acquire influence, within particular districts, is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts.“

—  George Washington

1790s, Farewell Address (1796)
Contesto: One of the expedients of party to acquire influence, within particular districts, is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts. You cannot shield yourselves too much against the jealousies and heart-burnings, which spring from these misrepresentations; they tend to render alien to each other those, who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection.

„Envious of none, I am determined to be pleased with all; and this my dear friend, being the order for my march, I will move gently down the stream of life, until I sleep with my Fathers.“

—  George Washington

Letter http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=296 to Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette (1 February 1784)
1780s
Contesto: I am become a private citizen on the banks of the Potomac, and under the shadow of my own Vine and my own Fig-tree, free from the bustle of a camp and the busy scenes of public life, I am solacing myself with those tranquil enjoyments, of which the Soldier who is ever in pursuit of fame, the Statesman whose watchful days and sleepless nights are spent in devising schemes to promote the welfare of his own, perhaps the ruin of other countries, as if this globe was insufficient for us all, and the Courtier who is always watching the countenance of his Prince, in hopes of catching a gracious smile, can have very little conception. I am not only retired from all public employments, but I am retiring within myself; and shall be able to view the solitary walk, and tread the paths of private life with heartfelt satisfaction. Envious of none, I am determined to be pleased with all; and this my dear friend, being the order for my march, I will move gently down the stream of life, until I sleep with my Fathers.

„To place any dependence upon militia, is, assuredly, resting upon a broken staff.“

—  George Washington

Letter to the president of Congress, Heights of Harlem (24 September 1776)
1770s
Contesto: To place any dependence upon militia, is, assuredly, resting upon a broken staff. Men just dragged from the tender scenes of domestic life - unaccustomed to the din of arms - totally unacquainted with every kind of military skill, which being followed by a want of confidence in themselves when opposed to troops regularly trained, disciplined, and appointed, superior in knowledge, and superior in arms, makes them timid and ready to fly from their own shadows.

„The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.“

—  George Washington

1790s, Farewell Address (1796)
Contesto: The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism. But this leads at length to a more formal and permanent despotism. The disorders and miseries, which result, gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of Public Liberty.

„My manner of living is plain. I do not mean to be put out of it.“

—  George Washington

Letter to George William Fairfax (25 June 1786), published in The Writings Of George Washington (1835) by Jared Sparks, p. 175
1780s
Contesto: My manner of living is plain. I do not mean to be put out of it. A glass of wine and a bit of mutton are always ready; and such as will be content to partake of them are always welcome. Those, who expect more, will be disappointed, but no change will be effected by it.

„I am principled against this kind of traffic in the human species.“

—  George Washington

Letter to Robert Lewis, 18 August 1799, published in John Clement Fitzpatrick, The writings of George Washington from the original manuscript sources, volume 37, pp. 338-9
1790s
Contesto: To sell the overplus I cannot, because I am principled against this kind of traffic in the human species. To hire them out, is almost as bad, because they could not be disposed of in families to any advantage, and to disperse the families I have an aversion. What then is to be done? Something must or I shall be ruined; for all the money (in addition to what I raise by Crops, and rents) that have been received for Lands, sold within the last four years, to the amount of Fifty thousand dollars, has scarcely been able to keep me a float.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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