Frasi di John Dryden

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John Dryden

Data di nascita: 9. Agosto 1631
Data di morte: 1. Maggio 1700

John Dryden è stato un poeta, drammaturgo, critico letterario e traduttore inglese.

Lavori

„Guardati dalla furia di un uomo tranquillo.“

—  John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel

da "Absalom and Achitophel", 1681

„Iddio non creò l'opera Sua perché l'uomo la correggesse.“

—  John Dryden

Lettera a John Driden di Chesterton, 1700

„Tutte le ereditiere sono belle.“

—  John Dryden

Origine: Da Re Artù.

„Non prendere la vita che non puoi dare, | perché tutte le cose hanno un uguale diritto a vivere.“

—  John Dryden

Origine: Interpolazione di Dryden nella sua traduzione (1700) delle Metamorfosi di Ovidio, nei versi del cap. XV riguardanti il vegetarianismo pitagorico; citato in Erica Joy Mannucci, La cena di Pitagora, Carocci, Roma, 2008, p. 16. ISBN 978-88-430-4574-7

„Let those find fault whose wit's so very small,
They've need to show that they can think at all;
Errors, like straws, upon the surface flow;
He who would search for pearls, must dive below.“

—  John Dryden, All for Love

Prologue
Origine: All for Love (1678)
Contesto: Let those find fault whose wit's so very small,
They've need to show that they can think at all;
Errors, like straws, upon the surface flow;
He who would search for pearls, must dive below.
Fops may have leave to level all they can;
As pigmies would be glad to lop a man.
Half-wits are fleas; so little and so light,
We scarce could know they live, but that they bite.

„In friendship false, implacable in hate,
Resolved to ruin or to rule the state.“

—  John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel

Pt. I, lines 173–174.
Absalom and Achitophel (1681)

„How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms!“

—  John Dryden

A Discourse concerning the Original and Progress of Satire (1693).
Contesto: How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms! To spare the grossness of the Names, and to do the thing yet more severely, is to draw a full Face, and to make the Nose and Cheeks stand out, and yet not to employ any depth of Shadowing. This is the Mystery of that Noble Trade, which yet no Master can teach to his Apprentice: He may give the Rules, but the Scholar is never the nearer in his practice. Neither is it true, that this fineness of Raillery is offensive. A witty Man is tickl'd while he is hurt in this manner, and a Fool feels it not. The occasion of an Offence may possibly be given, but he cannot take it. If it be granted that in effect this way does more Mischief; that a Man is secretly wounded, and though he be not sensible himself, yet the malicious World will find it for him: yet there is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly Butchering of a Man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the Head from the Body, and leaves it standing in its place.

„Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.“

—  John Dryden

On Fortune; Book III, Ode 29, lines 81–87.
Imitation of Horace (1685)
Contesto: I can enjoy her while she's kind;
But when she dances in the wind,
And shakes the wings and will not stay,
I puff the prostitute away:
The little or the much she gave is quietly resign'd:
Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.

„From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.“

—  John Dryden

St. 1.
A Song for St. Cecilia's Day http://www.englishverse.com/poems/a_song_for_st_cecilias_day_1687 (1687)
Contesto: From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
When nature underneath a heap
Of jarring atoms lay,
And could not heave her head,
The tuneful voice was heard from high,
'Arise, ye more than dead!'
Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry,
In order to their stations leap,
And Music's power obey.
From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.

„The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.“

—  John Dryden

Epistle to John Driden of Chesterton (1700), lines 92–95.
Contesto: Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought,
Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught.
The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.

„I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began“

—  John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada

Part 1, Act I, scene i.
The Conquest of Granada (1669-1670)
Contesto: I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began,
When wild in woods the noble savage ran.

„If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.“

—  John Dryden

Origine: Alexander’s Feast http://www.bartleby.com/40/265.html (1697), l. 97–106.
Contesto: Softly sweet, in Lydian measures,
Soon he soothed his soul to pleasures.
War, he sung, is toil and trouble;
Honor but an empty bubble;
Never ending, still beginning,
Fighting still, and still destroying.
If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.

„Preventing angels met it half the way,
And sent us back to praise, who came to pray.“

—  John Dryden

Britannia Rediviva (1688), line 1.
Contesto: Our vows are heard betimes! and Heaven takes care
To grant, before we can conclude the prayer:
Preventing angels met it half the way,
And sent us back to praise, who came to pray.

„Not heaven itself upon the past has power;
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.“

—  John Dryden

Book III, Ode 29, lines 69–72.
Imitation of Horace (1685)
Contesto: Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine,
The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine.
Not heaven itself upon the past has power;
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.

„Happy, happy, happy pair!
None but the brave,
None but the brave,
None but the brave deserves the fair.“

—  John Dryden

Origine: Alexander’s Feast http://www.bartleby.com/40/265.html (1697), l. 12–15.

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