Frasi di John Donne

John Donne photo
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John Donne

Data di nascita: 1572
Data di morte: 31. Marzo 1631

John Donne è stato un poeta, religioso e saggista inglese, nonché avvocato e chierico della Chiesa d'Inghilterra.

Scrisse sermoni e poemi di carattere religioso, traduzioni latine, epigrammi, elegie, canzoni, sonetti e satire. Può essere considerato come il rappresentante inglese del concettismo durante il Siglo de Oro.

La sua poetica fu nuova e vibrante per quanto riguarda il linguaggio e l'invettiva delle metafore, specie se paragonato ai suoi contemporanei. Lo stile di Donne è caratterizzato da sequenze iniziali ex abrupto e vari paradossi, dislocazioni e significati ironici. La sua frequente drammaticità e i discorsi da ritmi giornalieri, la sua tesa sintassi e la sua eloquenza di pensiero furono sia una struggente reazione nei confronti dell'uniformità convenzionale della poetica elisabettiana sia un adattamento in inglese delle tecniche barocche e manieriste europee.

Celebre il suo sermone Nessun uomo è un'isola citato da Ernest Hemingway in epigrafe a Per chi suona la campana, e da cui trae ispirazione un omonimo libro di Thomas Merton.

Lavori

Holy Sonnets
John Donne

Frasi John Donne

„Ma, ahimè, perché così lungamente, | e tanto, freniamo i nostri corpi?“

—  John Donne

Origine: Da L'Estasi; citato in Charles Morgan, La fontana, Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, 1961.

„I confronti sono odiosi.“

—  John Donne

Origine: Da Elegy, VIII; citato in Giuseppe Fumagalli, Chi l'ha detto?, Hoepli, 1921, p. 296.

„Che i nostri affetti non uccidano noi, né muoiano essi.“

—  John Donne

Origine: Citato in prefazione a Clive Staples Lewis, I quattro amori, Jaca Book, 1982.

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„Be thine own palace, or the world's thy jail.“

—  John Donne

Origine: The Poems of John Donne; Miscellaneous Poems (Songs and Sonnets) Elegies. Epithalamions, or Marriage Songs. Satires. Epigrams. the Progress of

„I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved?“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contesto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace,
As I have seen in one autumnal face.“

—  John Donne

No. 9, The Autumnal, line 1
Elegies
Origine: The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose

„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

—  John Donne, libro Holy Sonnets

No. 10, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Contesto: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

„If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contesto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise“

—  John Donne, libro Holy Sonnets

No. 7, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Contesto: At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise
From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scattred bodies go.

„They'are ours, though they'are not we“

—  John Donne

The Extasy, line 45
Contesto: We then, who are this new soul, know
Of what we are compos'd and made,
For th' atomies of which we grow
Are souls, whom no change can invade.
But oh alas, so long, so far,
Our bodies why do we forbear?
They'are ours, though they'are not we; we are
The intelligences, they the spheres.

„Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contesto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contesto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contesto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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